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Sh3ld0n

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About Sh3ld0n

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  • Birthday 01/18/1966
  1. I am surprised that so many here find Howard so entertaining. I enjoy the Howard character also but thought Leonard or Sheldon would have been most people's first choice. May I ask the appeal of Howard? I also noticed Leonard scored relatively poorly. Could I get some feedback about this? Cheers, Peter...
  2. Sh3ld0n

    The N-word

    To me, a lack of social posturing is one of the more significant aspects of being a "nerd". In the context of the show, the prerequisite for being a nerd seems to be intelligence and social ineptitude, imo. Interestingly, Penny is used as a dramatic contrast with her being extremely socially adept in terms of the mating game but having limited education and intellectual acuity. Here is a quick compilation of some of the definitions found via Google: 1. a boring or unpopular person, esp one obsessed with something specified: a computer nerd 2. a stupid and feeble person Nerd is a term that refers to an intelligent but single-minded person obsessed with a nonsocial hobby or pursuit.[1] Nerds are generally considered to be awkward, shy and/or unattractive by most, although this is not always true.[2] Thus, a nerd is often excluded from physical activity and considered a loner by others, or will tend to associate with a small group of like-minded people, although again, this is not always the case. 1. A foolish, inept, or unattractive person. 2. A person who is single-minded or accomplished in scientific or technical pursuits but is felt to be socially inept. An 'individual', i.e. a person who does not conform to society's beliefs that all people should follow trends and do what their peers do. Often highly intelligent but socially rejected because of their obesssion with a given subject, usually computers. Unfortunately, nerds seem to have problems breeding, to the detriment of mankind as a whole. : an unstylish, unattractive, or socially inept person; especially : one slavishly devoted to intellectual or academic pursuits Cheers, Peter...
  3. Being high functioning autistic, I found Sheldon fascinating. I personally see him as a positive autistic role model, even though the writers refuse to acknowledge the "fact" that he is largely based on someone with AS. Cheers, Peter... PS...In a previous post in another thread I had the impression that there is confusion about "high functioning" autism. If I understand the term correctly, "high functioning" simply means a person can function reasonably well within normal social parameters as opposed to those with profound autism who essentially need a carer.
  4. I'm probably wrong but this comes across as a personal attack? I don't recall seeing this particular episode so I can't comfortably comment on whether or not Raj made an excusable error in judgement. I will merely make the point that within the scope of fallible human behaviour/psychology, it seems plausible to me that booze and youthful testosterone levels might have mitigated personal responsibility. Cheers, Peter...
  5. Sh3ld0n

    Howard and Nuns

    I think you hit it on the head... Cheers, Peter...
  6. Hi guys, Not sure if there is a thread on this already. "(1)" Being your favourite character, what is your order of preference in regards to the cast members? (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) Etc... Cheers, Peter...
  7. I am in total agreement. When I recently saw the re-run of Sheldon first meeting Penny, there appeared to be a definite sexual appreciation which was out of character later on. I find it surprising that such gifted writers hadn't fully tweaked the concept of a "Sheldon" at the show's genesis. Cheers, Peter...
  8. Sorry for going O/T. To me you seem to have a poetic/artistic style and there is a degree of artistic license associated with this. However, the term "peccadilloes " in this context is misleading when applying it to base characteristics related to autism. I agree with you that male and female AS individual tend to have slightly different character traits, one being they tend to have a greater ability to socially blend in. Cheers, Peter... "Correct Sheldon"? There is nothing wrong with him... He is simply an ultra-individual. There is a general belief that Einstein and Newton were high functioning austistic. Was there a need to "correct" them? Amy doesn't bother me and adds to the series to a degree. It was nice to see Sheldon and Amy study the odd neurologically typical humans (i.e. the rumour generation/dissemination experiment). It was satisfying to see Sheldon not having to contend with a (to him) foreign, arbitrary and confusing social protocol when interacting with Amy. Cheers, Peter...
  9. Personally I would like some reference to high functioning autism even if t is only via speculation about Sheldon... It is the least the writers could do since a large part of the show's success is based on Sheldon's quirkiness. Cheers, Peter...
  10. \ I tend to agree also. I dislike the character and believe she was designed not to be a permanent fixture. Cheers, Peter...
  11. This was discussed on an autism news group. The consensus was the originators of the series didn't want to deal with any potential legal issues if they did in fact declare Sheldon Cooper high functioning autistic. Personally speaking, there is no doubt in my mind that the Sheldon character was created using the characteristics of someone on the autistic spectrum. Cheers, Peter... PS...I know I have replied to an old post...
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