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Does Sheldon have Asperger's Syndrome?


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One of the reasons why I love this show so much is because Sheldon reminds me so much of my 9-year-old son. He's like the grown-up version of my son, who has Asperger's. The mannerisms, social clueless-ness, inability to lie, lack of eye contact, ect... It is refreshing to see it put in a comical light on TV like that.

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I agree with SheldonCooper Fan. Sheldon has OCD (his knocking, his spot, his weekly shedule etc.)

Hi! Welcome to the forums! It hasn't been established whether he does, but he certainly does exhibit many characteristics of Asperger's syndrome - like the ones you list. Maybe the writers will reveal it one day.

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One of the reasons why I love this show so much is because Sheldon reminds me so much of my 9-year-old son. He's like the grown-up version of my son, who has Asperger's. The mannerisms, social clueless-ness, inability to lie, lack of eye contact, ect... It is refreshing to see it put in a comical light on TV like that.

As an ESE teacher, I picked up on the obvious Asperger's-like mannerims and personality, too. I bet that's not what they were going to on a true comedic tv show, but to those who know, Sheldon's Asperger's is obvious.

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  • 3 years later...

i made an account on this site to say that i think it would be a great thing if sheldon had asburgers. it would be nice for the community who makes fun of people with aspergers but love the show to see a beloved charictor haveing what they make fun of. i have aspergers. and maby if someone everyone loved had it to. me having it wouldnt be such a big deal anymore.

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There is a really nice thread on this site from some of the members talking about AS. If you do a forum /search of "Aspergers" you should find it.

Surprising to see just how many members have/or know someone with AS. I personally had never heard of AS until visiting this forum. I was pleasantly educated on it, ty.

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Surprising to see just how many members have/or know someone with AS. I personally had never heard of AS until visiting this forum. I was pleasantly educated on it, ty.

This is the same for me, never heard of it before I started watching tbbt

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As certainly as neutrinos do not, in fact, exceed the speed of light - yes. I am very similar to Sheldon - I even had several conversations that he had nearly verbatim about buying tampons in bulk with my mom (when I was 15), as well as explaining that at our current velocity, a sudden stop would place us in the same spot as the car several ahead (when I was 13), as an eight-year-old insisted on going to school dressed up for Halloween as Uranus, insisting that I didn't care if the others "got" it, as that was not the point, and when I am compelled to say something but someone interrupts, I get something of a tic until I can say it in full. About the only traits we do not share are sex, (mis)understanding of sarcasm, libido, and our opinion as to the long-term viability of superstring theories. Oh, and I've wanted to go into theoretical physics to study the problem of quantum gravity since I was 12, which surprised my classmates in eighth grade "physical science" when I announced it at the beginning of the year (the teacher made us all give a brief introduction of our selves, including desired occupation). I tend to speak in a much more formal, stilted manner than I write.

I actually have fewer characteristics of AS than does Sheldon, and I was diagnosed at age 10 (more like nine and a half, really), the same time they determined I had genius IQ and I was teaching myself calculus from a textbook I demanded my mom purchase from Goodwill. Oh, and when I was 13 I firmly believed I would achieve greatness in physics on the scale of Isaac Newton and made an arrogant statement to that effect. Nowadays I'm less arrogant than Sheldon. If Sheldon doesn't have AS, nobody does.

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I am very interested in this question; as well as being on the spectrum myself (I was only diagnosed when I was in my late 20's), my wife runs an autistic unit.

I know Jim Parsons, (in an early interview), said when he first read for the part, that he approached Chuck Lorre and asked if his character was meant to have Aspergers - he was told a very clear no!

What ever Chuck Lorre's reason for this, I actually prefer Sheldon just being shown to us as Sheldon - because while I think it is great that so many people are diagnosed and labelled nowadays, I think it is more important take someone as you find them - and labels sometimes confuse that.

Matt

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  • 1 month later...

As certainly as neutrinos do not, in fact, exceed the speed of light - yes. I am very similar to Sheldon - I even had several conversations that he had nearly verbatim about buying tampons in bulk with my mom (when I was 15), as well as explaining that at our current velocity, a sudden stop would place us in the same spot as the car several ahead (when I was 13), as an eight-year-old insisted on going to school dressed up for Halloween as Uranus, insisting that I didn't care if the others "got" it, as that was not the point, and when I am compelled to say something but someone interrupts, I get something of a tic until I can say it in full. About the only traits we do not share are sex, (mis)understanding of sarcasm, libido, and our opinion as to the long-term viability of superstring theories. Oh, and I've wanted to go into theoretical physics to study the problem of quantum gravity since I was 12, which surprised my classmates in eighth grade "physical science" when I announced it at the beginning of the year (the teacher made us all give a brief introduction of our selves, including desired occupation). I tend to speak in a much more formal, stilted manner than I write.

I actually have fewer characteristics of AS than does Sheldon, and I was diagnosed at age 10 (more like nine and a half, really), the same time they determined I had genius IQ and I was teaching myself calculus from a textbook I demanded my mom purchase from Goodwill. Oh, and when I was 13 I firmly believed I would achieve greatness in physics on the scale of Isaac Newton and made an arrogant statement to that effect. Nowadays I'm less arrogant than Sheldon. If Sheldon doesn't have AS, nobody does.


Captain Quirk you sound so much like my son he is 15 and we only found out when he was 12 that he has asoergers. What a cool kid he is, his is so unique. He loves to get dressed up for school, good pants, dress shirt, and tie every day. Does not care what anyone thinks of him. He is very smart, he also teaches himself calculus from a textbook and demans me to purchase old books. He is very interested in WWII and German uniforms, star wars and old money. Loves old stuff. I love the fact that he does not care what people think of him which gives him is own person. I on the other hand worrry consintly what people think of me. When I found out that he had aspergers I was upset but now I think it just is so cool that he can be himself and not have the worry of fitting in, etc. My son is a awesome kid, just as I am sure you are.

By the way I think Sheldon has aspergers! He sure can't pick up on social queues.


One of the reasons why I love this show so much is because Sheldon reminds me so much of my 9-year-old son. He's like the grown-up version of my son, who has Asperger's. The mannerisms, social clueless-ness, inability to lie, lack of eye contact, ect... It is refreshing to see it put in a comical light on TV like that.

I like it too because my 15 year old son has aspergers also and this just cracks me up how funny they all are. My son is very much like Sheldon too. I only recently started watching the show and I love it.

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Despite a lot of similarities, I don't think Sheldon has Asperger's. I'm not sure how to describe it but I've seen a lot of people with Asperger's and Sheldon's different. He's more like someone who is OCD where he likes everything a certain way and it drives him crazy if he can't do it that way. Obsesses over what time to play Halo...if it's after the start time, it bugs him. I have friends with OCD and this describes them to a T. As for Sheldon's insensitivity (Which can be described as an area of Asperger's), I can't remember what episode it was but Sheldon said something about how he always said the truth because there was no point in lying and his mother always said lying makes Jesus sad. (Or something to that effect).

I think he's just very narrow minded in the fact that growing up, with being bullied and being a genius he was different from everyone else so he focussed on himself rather than other people (as he had no friends to pay attention to him). He's emotionally stunted because he didn't have much interactions with friends. If you see the flashback episode of when Leonard met Sheldon, the show points out that Sheldon was much worse before he had friends.

Anyways, that's how I see it and it's like the show points out that eventually Sheldon will be more bearable. He's already changing a little because he's adapted (even if he didn't like it) to Penny's intrusions and random appearances in his life. Someone with Aspergers (in my opinion) would find it much more difficult to adapt.

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  • 2 months later...

Obviously Sheldon has Asperger's. He is almost a perfect textbook model of an aspie. But I appreciate that the writers don't consciously and intentionally plan him that way -- they based him on some software engineers they knew, according to what I read somewhere. That makes him a much more natural character than if he were based on some template or written to fit some label.

I have also read that the writers don't want to consider him an aspie because they have picked up the idea that Asperger's is an "ailment" or "disease," and if Sheldon had a "disease," it would not be right for his friends to make fun of him, and the show would be like an Afterschool Special rather than a lighthearted sitcom. That's okay. As I said, their refusal to label him makes him more of a natural and nuanced character.

Asperger's is not a "disease," though -- it is a certain way the brain is wired neurologically. And, yes, aspies are not all just like Sheldon -- there is a whole cluster of "classic" aspie characteristics and no aspie has all of them... well, except Sheldon.

Someone with Aspergers (in my opinion) would find it much more difficult to adapt.

I have to disagree with that. Social skills don't come naturally to aspies the way they do to neurotypicals, but aspies who want to learn them can. (Actually, for me one of the most hilarious aspects of the show is the way that both Sheldon and Amy study and try to apply "rules" of social interaction.) I personally have worked hard at social skills for years, and now fit in among neurotypicals with little problem. If anything, I am considered very sensitive friend now because I am more hyper-alert to social cues than neurotypicals who have always taken them for granted.

Or I guess the point you were making was about his tolerance to interruptions and disruptions of his routine. But aspies can learn to adapt to that as well.

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I hope it is permissible to post articles from other web pages. The original page that this was taken from appears to have gone extinct years ago, but I found this article (with its original, defunct link) reposted on another forum.

This is, of course, supposed to represent how "neurotypicals" (normal folks) appear to an aspie, and parodies the way Asperger's Syndrome is so often represented as some sort of disease. So think of this as how Sheldon looks at "normal" folks:

Understanding Neurotypicality (a parody) <-- (see, the author has to explain to us he is being sarcastic)

http://home.att.net/~ascaris1/neurotypicality.html

by Frank Klein

Understanding Neurotypicality

Neurotypicality is a pervasive developmental condition, probably present since birth, in which the affected person sees the world in a very strange manner. It is a puzzle; a enigma that traps those so affected in a lifelong struggle for social status and recognition. Neurotypical individuals almost invariably show a triad of impairments, consisting of inability to think independently of the social group, marked impairment in the ability to think logically or critically, and inability to form special interests (other than in social activity). It is my hope that this article will help us understand the very different world of the neurotypical.

Neurotypical individuals show difficulty in forming an individual identity, or in thinking outside of the bounds of the accepted norms of their social groups. It appears that each group a neurotypical belongs to will have its own set of "official" opinions, and each neurotypical within that group is expected to adopt those beliefs. As strange as it sounds, they generally do so very readily, and are not hesitant at all to help enforce those beliefs and ensure group homogeneity of opinion. There appears to be an innate drive for the neurotypical to fit in with groups in that manner, and their own innate opinions and desires are modified automatically to fit the group ideal. This bizarre lack of independence explains the tendency for neurotypicals to engage in fads of various sorts, or for the existence of certain trends. Neurotypicals will change the way they talk or dress according to these trends, and other neurotypicals will admire and imitate such "trendy" behavior. As such, neurotypicals are easy prey for TV commercials or other means of advertising that seek to portray the purchase or use of various products as socially desirable or "cool."

The need for neurotypical individuals to "jump on" the latest trend is a function of their excessive level of concern of how they are perceived by others. Neurotypicals form their self-image based at least as much on the opinions of their peers as they do on their own opinions. They do not perceive themselves as individuals in the manner that you or I do; they see themselves as individual members of a group. The opinions of others weigh heavily upon them, and there is a great drive to obtain the acceptance and admiration of others around them, including complete strangers. There is a built-in tendency for neurotypicals to blend in, to become "one of the herd," so to speak. Most of them never realize how much their opinions are dictated by the group. They want the things that the group deems desirable, and they internalize that desire so fully that it feels to them as if it was an internally-motivated desire.

The overdeveloped social centers of the neurotypical brain are also responsible for their odd, inefficient communication style. We've all seen the strange tendency neurotypicals have to hide their true communicative intent beneath layers of often contradictory statements. They tend to state things implicitly rather than explicitly, and with a level of vagueness that often results in miscommunication. This appears to be an outgrowth of the neurotypical person's desire to maintain popularity and social status; they seem to believe that by stating potentially annoying or offensive things indirectly, their popularity will be better maintained. This obsessive concern with social standing makes communication with neurotypicals rather difficult at times. They are incapable of expressing things directly, in a manner that can be easily and unambiguously interpreted by anyone that knows the language. They are also limited in their capacity to interpret statements directly without trying to find hidden meanings in them; they often misunderstand the most basic statements in this way.

People with neurotypicality tend to communicate in a very vague manner. They make guesses as to the level of knowledge of the listener, and omit parts that the listener is presumed to know. It is rather obvious that this guessing will often be wrong. Unfortunately, the listener that does not understand will generally not ask for clarification of such ambiguities, for fear of the speaker thinking that he is stupid or ignorant. As is usually the case with neurotypicals, image and status is more important than effective communication and the truth in general. Communication between neurotypicals is very limited in this way, and the fear of being seen as stupid prevents either party from verifying the content of the conversation. As such, most miscommunication goes undetected by at least one, if not all, neurotypicals that had engaged in such a conversation.

The neurotypical individual typically has a very limited capacity for logic or rational thought. The most recent research on the topic suggests that neurotypical people are not able to separate their emotions from their logic, and they often confuse the two. This is an obvious explanation for the sometimes appalling illogicality evidenced in neurotypical behavior. Neurotypicals typically exhibit very limited critical thought, and they are easily led to believe some rather illogical things. Sadly, most societal positions that require logic and rational thought are occupied by neurotypicals, which is a function of their sheer numbers more than any fitness for the job. Such jobs include important functions like jurors, legislators, judges, voters, doctors, and many others. If their herd mentality did not result in excessive rates of reproduction, their numbers would be smaller, and they would be of more use in job titles like salesperson, receptionist, cashier, and others where rational thought is less emphasized than social interaction.

Neurotypicals have a very limited ability to concentrate on one topic for great lengths of time, or repeatedly. The apparent absence of special interests in neurotypicals is notable. Their concentrations on normal areas of interest like computers, machines, scientific interests, history, or other academic subjects, are limited, and are short in duration as well as relatively infrequent. It appears that nearly all neurotypicals share one singular special interest, and that is socializing. This is the only activity that the person with neurotypicality can engage in for more than short periods of time. The stereotyped neurotypical mannerism of "chatting," or communicating verbally with others even where no relevant or useful information is exchanged, is notable, and can be observed very often in neurotypicals that are engaging in perseverative social behavior. Why the neurotypical mind is limited in its flexibility insofar as selection of a special interest is not known at this time. This social interest is not terribly useful as far as society in general is concerned, and the neurotypical is unlikely to be capable of significant innovation, or of fostering societal advancement.

Without significant intervention, neurotypicals will continue to be dependent on us for generations to come. Unfortunately, the neurotypical herd mentality results in an excessive rate of birth of offspring that are genetically predisposed to be neurotypical, and as such the incidence of neurotypicality remains frighteningly high. As long as the numbers of neurotypicals are so high, it is unlikely that they will allow us to institute any remediative efforts to help them overcome their disability. We may think it is so sad to see neurotypical children being trained to maintain a group mentality and to forsake true individualism, but at this point it is unlikely that the neurotypical parents of these children will be able to overcome their aforementioned logic impairments to realize how important intervention is if their children are to live to their fullest potential. It is up to us to educate them, and to get them to see that every child is entitled to greatness, even if he was diagnosed with neurotypicality. There can be hope for a better future if we can reach these children in time.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Thank you for this thread.

I need help from those that know about aspergers. I think my dad might have a high functioning form of it. I started thinking about this several years ago when a boy in my son's boy scout troop was diagnosed. I had never heard of it before, but since so I have done a little research because of my dad.

I knew growing up that something was off. Especially once I got older, and I couldn't wait to get out of the house. I love my dad but I can't stand him most of the time. He loves me and he communicates his love for me, so that is not the problem. But if I knew he had this, I think it would make me feel better about a lot of things growing up that I never understood.

My dad has always had to have a routine to his day and week. If anything disrupts his routine, he can't handle it very well. If you ask him to do something (like come to visit) it has to be planned and he has to get out his map and worry about it first. He does it, but then has to recover (rest) from it. He is older (in his seventies) but he has always been this way. He has a certain chair he sits in and he watches TV all the time -- the TV schedule is very important to him. He is happy to just sit around and watch TV, and until it is "time" for him to do something else, like take his bath. He has to have things a certian way, like the way his clothes hang, or like, the thermostat has to set to a certain temperature. My mom has curtains hung in a hallway so that the air conditioner doesn't hit him a certain way in his chair and makes him cold.

He is oversensitive. He gets his feelings hurt very easily. You cannot criticize him, and he is thinks he is right about everything, but in most cases, he is wrong because he doesn't really get out much and really doesn't know anything about real life. He doesn't have the "smart" component, he failed a grade when he was in school, and he seems lazy to learn anything new. He worked at the post office for 20+ years sorting mail. He does not deal with change well and talks a lot about the past.

When I was a kid and had someone sleep over, he would yell at us up the stairs if we got up during the night and creeked the floor above his room. My friends were scared of him because he yelled. He would get mad over stupid things, like using too much toilet paper from the roll (it was wasteful). And, even now, if my mom calls me and we talk too long, my dad is yelling at her to get off in the background because of the phone bill. Keep in mind that they never call me.

Anyway, I could go on and on. On the flip side, my dad talks all the time about how much we mean to him, but his actions always show otherwise. It was very confusing growing up.

I have spend most of my life fighting parts of myself that are like him. I don't think I have it, but I think growing up around it makes it rub off of you. I have done things in my life that I never thought I would be able to do, because I force myself to and I recognize the traits from my dad.

What do you guys think? My husband thinks he is just spoiled.

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Part of this sounds to me like Asperger's and part of it doesn't.

This part does:

My dad has always had to have a routine to his day and week. If anything disrupts his routine, he can't handle it very well. If you ask him to do something (like come to visit) it has to be planned and he has to get out his map and worry about it first. He does it, but then has to recover (rest) from it. He is older (in his seventies) but he has always been this way. He has a certain chair he sits in and he watches TV all the time -- the TV schedule is very important to him. He is happy to just sit around and watch TV, and until it is "time" for him to do something else, like take his bath. He has to have things a certian way, like the way his clothes hang, or like, the thermostat has to set to a certain temperature. My mom has curtains hung in a hallway so that the air conditioner doesn't hit him a certain way in his chair and makes him cold. ... When I was a kid and had someone sleep over, he would yell at us up the stairs if we got up during the night and creeked the floor above his room.

There are several things in this paragraph that sound aspie-ish. First, about routine. (Like Sheldon and his spot.) Second, the need for predictability. (His need to be warned and prepared for a disruption like a visit really resonates with me.) The TV schedule may be important to him because of the fact that it is so predictable. Aspies (like Sheldon) tend to be attracted to fields like computers and physics because they involve regularity and predictability. If you are an aspie but not particularly smart, a job that involves sorting things (like mail) in regular predictable ways might be congenial.

Third, his hyper senses, which strikes others as excessive fussiness. The story "The Princess and the Pea" describes it. Or Sheldon asking the orange juice, "In what universe are you low pulp?"

On the other hand, these don't seem to me to have anything to do with Asperger's:

He is oversensitive. He gets his feelings hurt very easily. You cannot criticize him

Aspies I think can deal very well with direct, clear, straightforward criticism. It is all the equivocation and obfuscation the neurotypicals call "hinting" -- that is hard for an aspie, the same way sarcasm is.

and he is thinks he is right about everything.

Sheldon (as a prototypical aspie) might seem to give the impression that aspies think they are right about everything. In reality (this part of Sheldon really resonates with me). I am not Sheldon-smart, but nevertheless have very high IQ scores, and as a child I took refuge in the idea that the reason I didn't fit in with other people was that I was smarter than they were. The more of a social misfit I was, the more I took comfort in telling myself that I didn't need the approval of people dumber than me anyway. I so understand what lies below Sheldon's obnoxious know-it-all attitude. But I doubt this is like your father.

I also don't think that yelling and getting mad at stupid things are particularly aspie characteristics either. They are more the characteristics of someone who has had a frustrating and painful life and just seeks numbness now.

It sounds like your father has some aspie characteristics. Asperger's is not cut and dried, there is no one characteristic that all aspies share and no one person who has all the characteristics supposed to be of Asperger's. It is a spectrum, you can have some aspie-like characteristics and not others, and a person can decide for themselves if they have enough aspie characteristics to consider themselves aspie. (Or consider a family member, in your case.)

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Part of this sounds to me like Asperger's and part of it doesn't.

This part does:

My dad has always had to have a routine to his day and week. If anything disrupts his routine, he can't handle it very well. If you ask him to do something (like come to visit) it has to be planned and he has to get out his map and worry about it first. He does it, but then has to recover (rest) from it. He is older (in his seventies) but he has always been this way. He has a certain chair he sits in and he watches TV all the time -- the TV schedule is very important to him. He is happy to just sit around and watch TV, and until it is "time" for him to do something else, like take his bath. He has to have things a certian way, like the way his clothes hang, or like, the thermostat has to set to a certain temperature. My mom has curtains hung in a hallway so that the air conditioner doesn't hit him a certain way in his chair and makes him cold. ... When I was a kid and had someone sleep over, he would yell at us up the stairs if we got up during the night and creeked the floor above his room.

There are several things in this paragraph that sound aspie-ish. First, about routine. (Like Sheldon and his spot.) Second, the need for predictability. (His need to be warned and prepared for a disruption like a visit really resonates with me.) The TV schedule may be important to him because of the fact that it is so predictable. Aspies (like Sheldon) tend to be attracted to fields like computers and physics because they involve regularity and predictability. If you are an aspie but not particularly smart, a job that involves sorting things (like mail) in regular predictable ways might be congenial.

Third, his hyper senses, which strikes others as excessive fussiness. The story "The Princess and the Pea" describes it. Or Sheldon asking the orange juice, "In what universe are you low pulp?"

On the other hand, these don't seem to me to have anything to do with Asperger's:

He is oversensitive. He gets his feelings hurt very easily. You cannot criticize him

Aspies I think can deal very well with direct, clear, straightforward criticism. It is all the equivocation and obfuscation the neurotypicals call "hinting" -- that is hard for an aspie, the same way sarcasm is.

and he is thinks he is right about everything.

Sheldon (as a prototypical aspie) might seem to give the impression that aspies think they are right about everything. In reality (this part of Sheldon really resonates with me). I am not Sheldon-smart, but nevertheless have very high IQ scores, and as a child I took refuge in the idea that the reason I didn't fit in with other people was that I was smarter than they were. The more of a social misfit I was, the more I took comfort in telling myself that I didn't need the approval of people dumber than me anyway. I so understand what lies below Sheldon's obnoxious know-it-all attitude. But I doubt this is like your father.

I also don't think that yelling and getting mad at stupid things are particularly aspie characteristics either. They are more the characteristics of someone who has had a frustrating and painful life and just seeks numbness now.

It sounds like your father has some aspie characteristics. Asperger's is not cut and dried, there is no one characteristic that all aspies share and no one person who has all the characteristics supposed to be of Asperger's. It is a spectrum, you can have some aspie-like characteristics and not others, and a person can decide for themselves if they have enough aspie characteristics to consider themselves aspie. (Or consider a family member, in your case.)

Thank you for the detailed reply. That was very helpful.

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Despite a lot of similarities, I don't think Sheldon has Asperger's. . . . Anyways, that's how I see it and it's like the show points out that eventually Sheldon will be more bearable. He's already changing a little because he's adapted (even if he didn't like it) to Penny's intrusions and random appearances in his life. Someone with Aspergers (in my opinion) would find it much more difficult to adapt.

That's how I see it, too. Sheldon's behavior is more a product of growing up alone and isolated from others, which is common with extremely intelligent kids, particularly when they don't even have others within the family unit to support them. There's a reason Sheldon used to fantasize about aliens coming to Earth and taking him "back" with them -- he felt like an alien.

But now, with regular social interactions (although I hesitate to call Leonard and the guys his "friends" because frankly, they treat Sheldon like crap a lot of the time), we see him growing as a person. He is *aware* of what he lacks and, in those areas he deems worthwhile, he's willing to put forth the effort to learn. I'm no expert on Asperger's, but I don't think they have that same choice.

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Despite a lot of similarities, I don't think Sheldon has Asperger's. . . . Anyways, that's how I see it and it's like the show points out that eventually Sheldon will be more bearable. He's already changing a little because he's adapted (even if he didn't like it) to Penny's intrusions and random appearances in his life. Someone with Aspergers (in my opinion) would find it much more difficult to adapt.

That's how I see it, too. Sheldon's behavior is more a product of growing up alone and isolated from others, which is common with extremely intelligent kids, particularly when they don't even have others within the family unit to support them. There's a reason Sheldon used to fantasize about aliens coming to Earth and taking him "back" with them -- he felt like an alien.

But now, with regular social interactions (although I hesitate to call Leonard and the guys his "friends" because frankly, they treat Sheldon like crap a lot of the time), we see him growing as a person. He is *aware* of what he lacks and, in those areas he deems worthwhile, he's willing to put forth the effort to learn. I'm no expert on Asperger's, but I don't think they have that same choice.

I have a master's degree in counseling (I sound like Howard!!:icon_lol:) and I am married to an Aspie and it depends on the severity of their Aspie traits. I have seen some Aspies out functional in the world with a job and some that cannot take care of themselves and are living in a group home.

So depending on the severity and the social skills in question an Aspie can learn social skills although they may never come naturally to them.

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That's interesting. Again, not pretending to be an expert so just an honest question: are all socially-awkward and/or emotionally stunted people that way because they have Asperger's, or is it just that all Aspies fall into that category?

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That's interesting. Again, not pretending to be an expert so just an honest question: are all socially-awkward and/or emotionally stunted people that way because they have Asperger's, or is it just that all Aspies fall into that category?

With Aspies it is more of how their brains are hardwired than a personality quirk. With Aspies their brain doesn't register aspects of human behavior. I have heard it called mind blindness which means some aspects of interpersonal behavior just do not register on their brains.

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