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rachelshamyfan

Have any of you got any pets?

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I do not have pets, because the wild animals and birds that come to feed on my backyard are quite enough for me.

But hey, Walnutcowboy has really intersting pets, called wild walnuts!

-why not tell us about them, walnutcowboy? (hint hint!!!)

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I do not have pets, because the wild animals and birds that come to feed on my backyard are quite enough for me.

But hey, Walnutcowboy has really intersting pets, called wild walnuts!

-why not tell us about them, walnutcowboy? (hint hint!!!)

I haven't followed this thread for a while, and I don't know what made me look today BUT...

I still haven't found a way to get it from the PM I sent to you.

If you know how to post it here, you have my permission to use it/them here (I pray you can)!

I know a guy that can help me to retrieve it but that will take at least a few days to get that done that way.

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HEllo all. Here is Walnutcowboy's ramblings about his pets the wild walnuts. I thought them very amusing! Note that the whole text below is indeed from walnutcowboy, not from me.

Wild Walnuts do NOT "grow" on trees. During the life cycle of Wild Walnuts they go through several stages.

1) They start out as spores. If you have ever seen a Wild Walnut right after mating, you will see the spores.

2) After leaving the parent, the Wild Walnut will grow to about the size of a pea.They gather in groups and hide (as their shells are not yet hard) under leaves, in gopher holes, etc. We have trained dogs to sniff out these young Walnuts (like pigs can be trained to smell certain kinds of mushrooms). This is the prime time to round up the Wild Walnuts and protect them from themselves and other dangers.

3) When left on their own, they grow to full size and their shells start to harden, the Wild Walnut will begin to leave the group and start looking for a mate. This is a bad time for a Wild Walnut. As the Wild Walnuts battle for the best mates, their fights can be fierce, very gory and may last for several hours. Many Walnuts do not survive this cycle of their growth. This is why we we round them us when they are young.

4) After finding their mate, the Wild Walnuts will once more come together and gather in what most people call "walnut trees" (but it is only a birthing area) and together they will raise their spores. As a group they make very good parents.

5) Once the spores have left the hatching tree, the parent Walnut will leave the comfort of the birthing area also, and become what all Walnuts strive to become. A "THINKING WALNUT". At this, their final stage, they no longer roam around the country. They are content to just sit and think about "life, the Universe, and Everything". However this is the WORST time for Wild Walnut because this is when the ignorant will catch the Walnuts, crack their skulls and eat their brains!!

We collect the THINKING WALNUTS as soon as we can to protect them from the thoughtless masses. At this point in their cycle of growth they are very docile and need very little care.

We also raise domestic Walnuts that do not USUALLY fight during the mating season, so many more can live out their life cycle.

I hope this answers all of your questions, and we hope you will help us in protecting THE THINKING WALNUT by protesting the killing of of such a wonderful creature.

PS We do have adoption plans for those who can not have THINKING WALNUTS of their own.

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HEllo all. Here is Walnutcowboy's ramblings about his pets the wild walnuts. I thought them very amusing! Note that the whole text below is indeed from walnutcowboy, not from me.

Wild Walnuts do NOT "grow" on trees. During the life cycle of Wild Walnuts they go through several stages.

1) They start out as spores. If you have ever seen a Wild Walnut right after mating, you will see the spores.

2) After leaving the parent, the Wild Walnut will grow to about the size of a pea.They gather in groups and hide (as their shells are not yet hard) under leaves, in gopher holes, etc. We have trained dogs to sniff out these young Walnuts (like pigs can be trained to smell certain kinds of mushrooms). This is the prime time to round up the Wild Walnuts and protect them from themselves and other dangers.

3) When left on their own, they grow to full size and their shells start to harden, the Wild Walnut will begin to leave the group and start looking for a mate. This is a bad time for a Wild Walnut. As the Wild Walnuts battle for the best mates, their fights can be fierce, very gory and may last for several hours. Many Walnuts do not survive this cycle of their growth. This is why we we round them us when they are young.

4) After finding their mate, the Wild Walnuts will once more come together and gather in what most people call "walnut trees" (but it is only a birthing area) and together they will raise their spores. As a group they make very good parents.

5) Once the spores have left the hatching tree, the parent Walnut will leave the comfort of the birthing area also, and become what all Walnuts strive to become. A "THINKING WALNUT". At this, their final stage, they no longer roam around the country. They are content to just sit and think about "life, the Universe, and Everything". However this is the WORST time for Wild Walnut because this is when the ignorant will catch the Walnuts, crack their skulls and eat their brains!!

We collect the THINKING WALNUTS as soon as we can to protect them from the thoughtless masses. At this point in their cycle of growth they are very docile and need very little care.

We also raise domestic Walnuts that do not USUALLY fight during the mating season, so many more can live out their life cycle.

I hope this answers all of your questions, and we hope you will help us in protecting THE THINKING WALNUT by protesting the killing of of such a wonderful creature.

PS We do have adoption plans for those who can not have THINKING WALNUTS of their own.

SHERMiNATOR,

I can't thank you enough for posting my Wild Walnut story.

For those who are interested, this is what I can do on a VERY good day.

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HEllo all. Here is Walnutcowboy's ramblings about his pets the wild walnuts. I thought them very amusing! Note that the whole text below is indeed from walnutcowboy, not from me.

Wild Walnuts do NOT "grow" on trees. During the life cycle of Wild Walnuts they go through several stages.

1) They start out as spores. If you have ever seen a Wild Walnut right after mating, you will see the spores.

2) After leaving the parent, the Wild Walnut will grow to about the size of a pea.They gather in groups and hide (as their shells are not yet hard) under leaves, in gopher holes, etc. We have trained dogs to sniff out these young Walnuts (like pigs can be trained to smell certain kinds of mushrooms). This is the prime time to round up the Wild Walnuts and protect them from themselves and other dangers.

3) When left on their own, they grow to full size and their shells start to harden, the Wild Walnut will begin to leave the group and start looking for a mate. This is a bad time for a Wild Walnut. As the Wild Walnuts battle for the best mates, their fights can be fierce, very gory and may last for several hours. Many Walnuts do not survive this cycle of their growth. This is why we we round them us when they are young.

4) After finding their mate, the Wild Walnuts will once more come together and gather in what most people call "walnut trees" (but it is only a birthing area) and together they will raise their spores. As a group they make very good parents.

5) Once the spores have left the hatching tree, the parent Walnut will leave the comfort of the birthing area also, and become what all Walnuts strive to become. A "THINKING WALNUT". At this, their final stage, they no longer roam around the country. They are content to just sit and think about "life, the Universe, and Everything". However this is the WORST time for Wild Walnut because this is when the ignorant will catch the Walnuts, crack their skulls and eat their brains!!

We collect the THINKING WALNUTS as soon as we can to protect them from the thoughtless masses. At this point in their cycle of growth they are very docile and need very little care.

We also raise domestic Walnuts that do not USUALLY fight during the mating season, so many more can live out their life cycle.

I hope this answers all of your questions, and we hope you will help us in protecting THE THINKING WALNUT by protesting the killing of of such a wonderful creature.

PS We do have adoption plans for those who can not have THINKING WALNUTS of their own.

Awww..!! This is sweet! :D

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I have 1 yorkie/ chihuahua mix named Nikki. That's my baby

1 Pitt/lab mix named Coco

1 black cat named Evil Kitty. Name says it all

And 1 black cat named Brokeback. He was named after the movie and he had a weird spine.

He's ok now. :)

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 "WE" (think my wife and grand daughter) are now the owners of 2 Holland Lops Bunnies.

They are potty trained (thank GOD) !

They've taken over the spare bedroom.

In the few weeks that we've had them, they (well one of them) really enjoys an obstacle course set up for them.

 As much as I was against them, they are cute little bugger.....I mean bunnies....yeah, that's,.. it cute little bunnies. 

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My black kitty's name is Fiona. 17 years ago I went to adopt her 2 kittens. They had already been taken, so I took Fiona. She was a rescued feral cat. She's been a shy, but wonderful companion for all those years.

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 @ STRAWBERRY,

It's great to find someone going the extra mile for a pet.

We had a friend who fosters feral cats then adopts them out.

It can be a lot of work, but it really pays off in the long run.

I'm sure Fiona loves you very much ! 

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I have a Corgi named Kipper

And an Eastern box turtle named Roxy

I had a cat named Einstein that recently died at 18 years old. Still hard not to include him in the count.

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Here's my cat, Zorro:

zy4a7yny.jpg

I have another named Schrödinger, but she's so skittish it's difficult to get a picture.

I also have two chocolate labs, Kodi and Sienna, and two ferrets, Samson and Olivia.

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We have 6 hamsters (what's a group of hamsters called? Other than crazy, that is...), 2 budgies (parakeets), and a bearded dragon. We do lots of pet sitting so right now also have a dog, 6 finches, a canary, a cat, and 5 more hamsters in the house. In that past we've also had a hermit crab (dullsville, and not recommended), fire-bellied newts and fish.

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 Q: What do you call a group of 6 hamsters?

 A: A poop machine !

Edited by walnutcowboy

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One dog, a rescued Saluki - named Samwise. Ahem. Also a gaggle of frogs in the garden, who probably don't really count.

walnutcowboy, your donkey kissing photo is really disturbing me! ;)

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 @ CHRIS,

If you haven't already, you might want to check out my profile (at the bottom), it explains a bit about that picture.

If you have already read my profile, and are still disturbed by the picture, then my job is a success (LOL) ! 

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