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Your poem reflects our feelings well, silverangel. :)

It's pleasure because  I can share  my feelings for Jim with somebody who knows what it's like. I  have more poems about Jim. Maybe I will post them  who knows.

Edited by silverangelD

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Slightly off topic here but according to Saturday Night Live's latest tweet, they are doing another suggestion day for their host and musical guests and if anyone is interested in having Jim finally host Saturday Night Live here is the tweet they sent out.

23128.6d21174d65a93fb73bef06680c538269.j

Edited by JoeSal90

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http://www.fanforum.com/f312/jim-parsons-sheldon-cooper-36-because-hes-golden-globes-nominee-63083374/index2.html

 

Yes there is a pic on the above link

 

Perhaps they are commitment rings to each other

 

whoopieee, That would be great. I love the thought of a official commitment after all these years.  :wub:  Seems the rings are similar. 

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That sounds like an interesting article. I'd like to read it. :)

 

It's kind of long, but it's really interesting, especially in listening to JP. :)

 

Texas talk is losing its twang, researchers say

Molly Hennessy-Fiske

Los Angeles Times

 

AUSTIN, Texas—Don Graham, an English professor at the University of Texas at Austin, likes to tell the story of a student who once worked as a cowboy.  “Wore hat and boots,” Graham says.  “He was the real deal.”

 

At the end of the academic year, the student told Graham, “You were the only professor at UT I ever had who spoke English.”

 

“What he meant,” Graham says, “was I was the only one who spoke his language.”

 

And by language, the student meant the distinctive Texan twang and drawl that becomes almost an attitude, from the first “howdy” to the last “thank you, kindly.”  Conversation can be as extreme as the landscape in Texas, where locals will tell you it gets hotter than a stolen tamale and the wind blows like perfume through a prom.

 

The former cowboy had noticed what Graham, a Texas native who grew up outside Dallas, had also detected over the years.  “Texas has always had its own almost national identity,” Graham said.  “Language was one of the commonalities that bound people together.  More and more, I hear fewer people that I talk to who sound like myself.”

 

Research bears out this suspicion: Urbanization, pop culture and an influx of newcomers, including Californians, with a Valley Girl dialect that has wormed its way into American speech since the 1970s, are eroding the iconic Texas twang.

 

Back in the 1980s, about 80 percent of Texans interviewed by researchers at UT Austin, including many students, had what they defined as traditional Texas accents.  Now that’s down to a third.

 

The Texas manner of speech is being displaced and modified by General American English, the generic, Midwestern dialect often heard on television.  That’s surprising to some, given the Texas accent’s enduring nature.

 

The Texas accent “has great symbolic value.  It has a local identity versus, say, Arizona English.  That makes Texas English more resilient,” said Lars Hinrichs, an English language and linguistics professor at UT Austin.

 

There are many aspects to “talking Texan”: pronunciation, cadence and syntax, not to mention vocabulary.  And, technically, there are several Texas accents, the drawl of East Texans like Matthew McConaughey, say, or the nasal West Texas twang of Laura Bush.

 

By interviewing and monitoring scores of Texans, then measuring sound waves when they speak, Hinrichs and a team of researchers at UT Austin’s 5-year –old Texas English Project hope to gauge the degree to which Texas accents and dialects have changed.

 

Texas accents are traditionally considered variants of Southern American English, spoken from southern Maryland to eastern New Mexico, noticeable in words like pie (pah) and my (mah).

 

But that pronunciation varies in Texas—as with most Southern states—from region to region, especially when the vowel is followed by a consonant, which some Texans pronounce as a diphthong, or two-part sound.  Examples of Texified diphthongs: “TRAY-up” (trap), “FAH-ees” (face) and “KAY-ut” (cat).

 

Many younger Texans are abandoning the diphthongs, and can no longer differentiate the vowels in cot and caught (CAW-ut)—just like Yankee counterparts, according to UT Austin researchers.

 

A similar transition is taking place with the “oo” sound.

 

“For instance,” Hinrichs says one day at his office as he pulls up graphs of sound waves on his office computer.  “What does a Texas ghost say?”

 

That would be “boo,” with the vowel sounding like the “oo” in “goose.”  At least if the ghost talks like an old-time Texan.  A modern Texas ghost might say “beeew.”  The new pronunciation is a variation of the monophthong that sounds more like a diphthong, more typical of Northern and Midwest speakers.

 

Hinrichs’ graphs showed that change, or “dialect leveling,” as divergent lines, most apparent among younger speakers.  It appears to have spread from Dallas to Houston and into central Texas.  One of his graduate students, Axel Bohmann, 28 speculates that the change was due in part to younger people “style shifting,” speaking with different accents in different settings, say, at home and at work, or adopting aspects of accents they hear in mass media.

 

“Young women are generally more attuned to the prestige of things: clothes, makeup and language.  So they play around with that,” Hinrichs says.

 

He and Bohmann are both from Germany, drawn to central Texas by its mix of dialects and accents, the legacy of Southern, Mexican and German immigrants.

 

“It’s one of the most vibrant places to study language change and dialects,” Hinrichs says.  “Dialects used to be a simple function of place.  Now they’re a more complex function of identity.”

 

Another doctoral student working with Hinrichs, Kate Shaw Points, is a 32-year-old Boston native who has lived in Texas for almost a decade.  In that time she’s learned to talk Texan, but deploys it strategically.

 

“When I’m at the mechanic, I talk like a Texan because I don’t want them to cheat me,” she says, but when she’s watching a Red Sox game, she reverts.

 

She researched people who, depending on the setting, changed the way they said the “I” in “time.”  They might give it a Southern “ah” sound among fellow Texans, then switch to the clipped standard English “eye” in other settings.

 

Deborah Darnell, 51, a substitute teacher from Austin interviewed by the Texas English Project, says students are sometimes surprised by her pronounced accent.

 

“Where are you from?” they ask.  “Do you live in the country?”

 

Sometimes she jokes with them: “Oh yeah, I’ve been up since dawn, milking the cows and roping the horses.”

 

Darnell doesn’t even consider her accent that strong, certainly not compared to her grandmother “from San Antone” or her mother.

 

“My mom, she’s got a strong accent!  She’s 75 and she’ll say, ‘Oh my heavens, I sound like Lady Bird Johnson!’”  Darnell said.  “There’s not as many Texans, true Texans, anymore, because there’s a lot of people moving here from all over.”

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About SNL.  They've been asking, campaigning for JP to come on for years.  *sighs*
I hope he never does. I hope none of them do. I tried to watch an episode of SNL recently (the one with Jennifer Lawrence), and I was disgusted at how puerile it had become. SNL has not only jumped the shark, it long ago flung itself willing down the shark's gullet and was shat out the other end. :( Sent from my Asus Transformer TF101 using Tapatalk 2

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whoopieee, That would be great. I love the thought of a official commitment after all these years.  :wub:  Seems the rings are similar. 

They are so faithfull to one another.. It's so sweet. He is with Jim at every award ceremony. It's so wonderful that Jim has somebody who makes him happy, and loves him. Rings indicate that this is. serious commitment

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They are so faithfull to one another.. It's so sweet. He is with Jim at every award ceremony. It's so wonderful that Jim has somebody who makes him happy, and loves him. Rings indicate that this is. serious commitment

 

It is very sweet as well for Jim and Todd with Todd being at the award ceremonies.

 

http://www.fanforum.com/f312/jim-parsons-sheldon-cooper-36-because-hes-golden-globes-nominee-63083374/index2.html

 

Yes there is a pic on the above link

 

Perhaps they are commitment rings to each other

I think they are also commitment rings as well rachygd

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It is very sweet as well for Jim and Todd with Todd being at the award ceremonies.

 

I think they are also commitment rings as well rachygd

It is as if he wanted to say: hey this is man whom I love, and I want everyone to know about it, and I want to show it to the world which isn't always tolerant. This is great proof of love.

Edited by silverangelD
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http://www.fanforum.com/f312/jim-parsons-sheldon-cooper-36-because-hes-golden-globes-nominee-63083374/index2.html

 

Yes there is a pic on the above link

 

Perhaps they are commitment rings to each other

Having looked at a few shots of these rings they do look to be more than just  'a ring' and more of some sign of commitment.  :-) bless them both.  Also seeing as there have been so many awards and pics lately and this is there first appearance i guess it explains Jim's either standing with his ring hand in pocket or fiddling with said ring, both unusual for him i thought.

 

With regards to his very sexy Texan drawl as a resident of the UK I find it most obvious when he is talking to Craig Ferguson and says "Creg" as opposed to "Craig" the English/Scottish pronunciation.  makes me smile every single time.

 

So cute

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Having looked at a few shots of these rings they do look to be more than just  'a ring' and more of some sign of commitment.  :-) bless them both.  Also seeing as there have been so many awards and pics lately and this is there first appearance i guess it explains Jim's either standing with his ring hand in pocket or fiddling with said ring, both unusual for him i thought.

 

With regards to his very sexy Texan drawl as a resident of the UK I find it most obvious when he is talking to Craig Ferguson and says "Creg" as opposed to "Craig" the English/Scottish pronunciation.  makes me smile every single time.

 

So cute

 

One moment I noticed was in Isolation Permutation, when Amy calls from the liquor store and Jim/Sheldon says, "Amy?"  It almost sounds like "eye-mee", the way a Texan might widen out that first A... :p

 

I wish I could have heard Jim back in the day before he worked on losing his accent.  Of course, being from Houston, and not the Texan hinterlands, he might not have had too radical an accent.

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I wish I could have heard Jim back in the day before he worked on losing his accent.  Of course, being from Houston, and not the Texan hinterlands, he might not have had too radical an accent.

 

I wish I could as well hear Jim back in the day before he worked on losing his accent phantagrae,

 

And here is a unaired (according to TV Guide) M&Ms commercial that TV Guide tweeted a couple of days ago (during the SAG awards) featuring a pre TBBT Jim Parsons and Ellie Kemper

 

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Jims ability to pull off a character like Sheldon with all his quirkiness and other stiff that goes with it shows just how good an actor he is

I agree with you. I think the role of Sheldon is difficult,  all the nuances, like the accent, and it isn't so easy to play a person with so many quirks, and to be serious at the same time, play it with whole being, and he is  so convincing playing Sheldon. When you watch the bloppeers, and  what the rest of the cast tells he is the best prepared, and he is the one who's the most rarely let himself to provoke to laugh during his scene

Edited by silverangelD
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Thanks for the article! I kept trying to compare the statements with Jim's accent. I like when they come up with Sheldon going deliberately Texas, like when he played his mother in the Spock play he wrote. Also, he did a bit of it when he talked of playing the Texan hyena in Hansel and Gretel - 

'ha kids'. :) And in the ten questions interview, when he tried to switch to a Texas accent after the interviewer asked him if he can do it on purpose.

 

I also love the way he says 'A-my' with the drawn out 'a'.. sounds more affectionate, somehow.

 

Is that a clip from Krys? Why do I see it only as a picture, on my computer?

 

Oo la la, his eyes always catch me unawares, when I see him suddenly. :icon_redface:

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Thanks for the article! I kept trying to compare the statements with Jim's accent. I like when they come up with Sheldon going deliberately Texas, like when he played his mother in the Spock play he wrote. Also, he did a bit of it when he talked of playing the Texan hyena in Hansel and Gretel - 

'ha kids'. :) And in the ten questions interview, when he tried to switch to a Texas accent after the interviewer asked him if he can do it on purpose.

 

I also love the way he says 'A-my' with the drawn out 'a'.. sounds more affectionate, somehow.

 

Is that a clip from Krys? Why do I see it only as a picture, on my computer?

 

Oo la la, his eyes always catch me unawares, when I see him suddenly. :icon_redface:

 

I think only the picture is posted in this thread.  I think the clip is in the Photos thread?

 

In the clip he's talking about a bit of Texas history--the early oil boom.

 

One other accent thing that has always struck me funny is the way he says Texas.  He says it almost with a Z sound, like Texuzzz, instead of a harder S on the end.  I don't think I'd heard it pronounced that way before.

 

"Hah!  Ahm Jimmy Joe Parsons and ahm from Houston, Texuzz!" :D

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I just watched the clip. He goes on so fast about the oil boom. :) And he definitely has more of an accent there than he normally does, probably because he's conscious it's about a Texas factoid.

 

I think I heard a little of what you mentioned the other day about his L sounds, like when he says "wells" in this clip.  He kind of swallows his L sound or something.  I wonder if he had a more pronounced lisp when he was a child.  Some of his pronunciations might be a combination of his overcoming his accent and maybe working past that lisp.  And he does seem to kind of talk out of the right side of his mouth or something, sometimes.

 

Anyway, whatever it is he does, he does it well. :)

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I think I heard a little of what you mentioned the other day about his L sounds, like when he says "wells" in this clip.  He kind of swallows his L sound or something.  I wonder if he had a more pronounced lisp when he was a child.  Some of his pronunciations might be a combination of his overcoming his accent and maybe working past that lisp.  And he does seem to kind of talk out of the right side of his mouth or something, sometimes.

 

Anyway, whatever it is he does, he does it well. :)

 

That's exactly what I meant. When he says 'always' it sounds like 'aw-ways'.

 

I like how we're analyzing his accent to death. :) But then, everything Jim is worth analyzing! And worth loving. 

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I watched the Spaghetti episode last night and he really did a twang when he said, "Italian"--not just saying the "I" like "Eye", but the whole word, or the "that's Italian".  So funny.

 

That whole spaghetti scene is funny, and I kept wondering about Jim and Kaley chowing down on that spaghetti because there was no fake eating in that scene--they had to really put forkfuls in their mouths.  I love the blooper from that scene, too, where Jim stumbles on that convoluted line about what Leonard had said. :D

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