Jump to content
The Big Bang Theory Forums
Sign in to follow this  
Miss Kitka

What Book Are You Reading?

Recommended Posts

Went through some newer books on psychology, to see if the field had developed.

-But sadly, the books contained nothing really new. Just some new names given to old ideas, and that's about it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Library was closed yesterday, so am reading nothing.

But tomorrow I'll get some Marcel Proust's works, in french, because they are apparetly the books to read if you want really get the french language.

 

Mind you, I've read them in finnish translations, and did not think much of them. Perhaps theyre better in french...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anyone here read comic books? :D (I mean the ones the TBBT nerds like)

Tried them recently, the marvel stuff and all that, but did not much like them.

 

I loved spiderman, batman and superman when I was a wee lad, but it seems adulthood has taken that joy out of me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've read (ages ago!) Fear of Flying by Erica Jong (an American, Jewish author)

 

"I wrote Fear of Flying in a mad rush, heart racing, adrenalin pumping, wanting to tell the truth about women whatever it costs me. I was determined to slice open a woman's head and show everything happening inside."
(Originally published in 1973, the ground-breaking, uninhibited story of Isadora Wing and her desire to fly free caused a national sensation.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

now reading the art biography of Tintoretto, an artist of the medieval 1500 period.

-I do not care much for the art of the period, too religious for me, but it is interesting to read about those times and how artists worked and lived back then...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

 

'I am currently reading "Faith in Fakes" by Umberto Eco. It's a semiotic analysis on mass culture, and I just finished another book of his, Apocalittici e integrati which is about mass culture from a sociological point of view.

I'm not much of a fiction reader, and Semiotics is one of my passions.'

I'm with you on that, semiotics is fascinating! I remember reading 'The Open Work' by Eco, and making fifty pages of notes! Also a big fan of Luis Jorge Borges, particularly 'Labyrinths'. But a book I'm always reading is 'Everything You Wanted To Know About Lacan But Were Afraid To Ask Hitchcock' edited by Slavoj Zizek, which examines mass culture through many disciplines. 

Edited by gaqo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This one:

 

9780821848593.jpg

 

It's very well written. Some say it's the bible for PDEs.

 

Like Bible? Are you saying it's full of nonsense, then???

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wanna start The Eye of the World.

Yikes, you're in for a long read lol. Be glad you started when the end was published. I started around book 4ish. I gave up after 9ish. I can only wait so many years for a story to end (GRRM is another issue for me).

Currently reading Snow Crash.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not that I've read DUNE, but has anyone else? So many books, I've no idea which one starts, where it ends. It seems like there are hundreds of them..! :D And how does the movie (with Sting) fit into it? Does the movie apply to one of the books?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not that I've read DUNE, but has anyone else? So many books, I've no idea which one starts, where it ends. It seems like there are hundreds of them..! :D And how does the movie (with Sting) fit into it? Does the movie apply to one of the books?

Best place to start is the original, "Dune." That's what the movie was based on, with lots of liberties taken. :)

Sent from my Samsung Galaxy S3 using Tapatalk

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 I just finished reading "AND ANOTHER THING" by EOIN COLFER.

The cover reads as follows:

 

                       DOUGLAS ADAM'S

       HITCHHIKER'S GUIDE TO THE GALAXY

                         PART 6 OF 3

 

                  AND ANOTHER THING

 

                       EOIN COLFER

 

 

 It is almost, but not quite exactly the way DOUGLAS ADAM would not have written it !

 The book takes over just as MOSTLY HARMLESS ends.

Which in my opinion is a good thing since in the end of MOSTLY HARMLESS everyone dies !

The book has (or at least talks about) almost everyone we have gotten to know in the last 5 books.

Some minor players have BIG parts in this book.

 In the start of the book you might think MR. ADAM'S is alive again !

But as the book continues MR COLFER overdoes the storytelling quite a bit.

The end of the story is better than MOSTLY HARMLESS (it would have to be), but to me it felt like MR. COLFER ran out of ideas and just plopped down an ending.

 

 For all of you who got depressed by the end of MOSTLY HARMLESS, then this book is for you.

Edited by walnutcowboy
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not that I've read DUNE, but has anyone else? So many books, I've no idea which one starts, where it ends. It seems like there are hundreds of them..! :D And how does the movie (with Sting) fit into it? Does the movie apply to one of the books?

Best place to start is the original, "Dune." That's what the movie was based on, with lots of liberties taken. :)

Sent from my Samsung Galaxy S3 using Tapatalk

Thanks, MJP - it's a very confusing series, as it were..! :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Been reading philosoply, from Heidegger to Hume.

And I have to say that most of western philosophy is just sophistry and nonsense.

 

I think Zen philosophers are right in saying that less words there are between you and reality, clearer you can see the reality.

 

The same way that when you think very hard, you cannot see the beautiful sights around you. But once you stop thinking, then you can see the beautiful sunrise, and enjoy it fully.

Our thoughts verily are like a curtain between us and the reality.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes all that Western philosophy, can lead to overthinking. Zen Buddhism offers a refreshing viewpoint, and meditation has allowed me to have a 'blissfully vacant' conscious mind, to enjoy the moment. While my subconscious plays with the ideas.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One night I bent my pointing finger

-Never such a moon!

-an ancient Zen koan

 

 

So, a zen philosopher solves the entire exsistential debacle with a short poem.

Heidegger had to spend 500 pages and invent dozen new words to do the same, and he still was unable to make his point.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd like to read this one when I can get it :)

The Women of the Cousins' War Non-fiction

thumb_99d0985635c31b4ebca38f95a743e9e4.j
 

About The White Queen, The Red Queen, and The Lady of the Rivers. Philippa Gregory and two historians, leading experts in their field, tell the extraordinary 'true' stories of the life of these women who until now have been largely forgotten by history.   With a foreword by Philippa Gregory - in which Philippa writes revealingly about the differences between history and fiction and examines the gaps in the historical record.

 

Last night I watched on TV BBC the adaptation (1/10 period-drama episodes) from this novel. To entertain myself for my summer hiatus.

Edited by wannamaker

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

History often tells of wars and politics and trade, but rarely bothers to mention the everyday life.

-Luckily modern history books do have 'everyday life in this and this place' -sections on them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Currently reading The Mayor of Casterbridge by Thomas Hardy and The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoyevsky.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Including the list you gave us last time, your mind must be growing by the minute! What did you think of 'Crime and Punishment'? I felt like I was Raskolnikov, haunted by the murder! Only 'Steppenwolf' by Hermann Hesse, has had a similar effect. At the other end of the literary scale, I'm reading 'Black Charity' by Bal Speer, a dark, graphic novel.

Edited by gaqo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Currently reading The Mayor of Casterbridge by Thomas Hardy and The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoyevsky.

 

Brothers Karamazov is brilliant!

-The best and most intelligent of whodunnit novels ever!

And yes, it is a murder mystery, in russian style!!!

 

All in all, best literature comes from russia/CCCP. Especially the literature written during soviet era is astonishing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.