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bigbangsheldon

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There hasn't been casting changes on Big Bang Theory. Only new cast members were added.

The Big Bang Theory is one of the few long running shows who has not seen any casting changex. All of it original 5 Cast Members are still with the show going into season 9 and will be for as long as the show on the air.

That is a great achivement.

Cheers for all of it casting changes through out it 11 Seasons went out on top when it left the air

 

I didn't say casting changes, I said cast changes.  Adding or removing cast members are cast changes and TBBT has had the following:  

 

 Sara Gilbert was promoted to and demoted from main cast in season two.  Melissa and Mayim were promoted to main cast in season four.  Kevin Sussman was also promoted to and demoted from Main cast in season 6, and then promoted back to main cast in season eight.  

 

And to clarify, dj, I'm talking about Main cast, those who are listed at the start of the show.   Everyone else, including those you mentioned, while considered recurring, are in reality, guest stars who are only on for specific plots.   Laura Spencer, while only recurring right now, fills a spot, in my mind at least, as a main cast member, simply because she is paired with one of the main cast.  At some point I strongly believe that Raj's girlfriend (whoever he ends up with) will be a main cast member.   

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People do not watch TV the way they used to lets wait until we get the live plus 7 numbers before we judge how many fans are watching this time of year a lot of people go on spring break and DVR the show or watch it online later fans today do not have to watch the show live anymore they have so many other options

 

The live plus seven are down this year also.    On average, it's down about 2 million in total viewers and down a full point in total demo.   Last week's (week 28) Live  + 7, based on week 25 (9 March) was below five million for the four time this year.  Last year they were below five million once, at 4.94 million.  But that episode set the record number of viewers in the regular time slot.   The average lift is down about 400,000 this year and average demo is down three tenths.    

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With the ability to binge watch shows now, could that have anything to do with some viewers waiting for the show to be on Netflix, Hulu or DVD before they watch a whole season?  I mean it does make it a lot easier to watch multiple episodes than to have to wait so long between each episode of a regular season.  Also there are shows now that are cutting down seasons and playing them all in a row and maybe viewers are just getting tired of the flip flop schedule of new and repeat episodes.

 

Just a thought...

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This subject matter is just so interesting. We are smack in the middle of amazing changing times in how our home entertainment is brought to us. Everything that was "normal" in our viewing habits/possibilities is in flux. Series like our favorite Thursday night half-hour will may soon be presented in an entirely different way.

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With the ability to binge watch shows now, could that have anything to do with some viewers waiting for the show to be on Netflix, Hulu or DVD before they watch a whole season?  I mean it does make it a lot easier to watch multiple episodes than to have to wait so long between each episode of a regular season.  Also there are shows now that are cutting down seasons and playing them all in a row and maybe viewers are just getting tired of the flip flop schedule of new and repeat episodes.

 

Just a thought...

 

That is precisely why advertisers are starting to look at the 18-34 demo more closely.   Those are the people that are more likely to watch in a non-traditional manner .   Not just binging, but also quite a few have disconnected from cable,  or at time shifting, so advertisers pay more for that demo for the Live + Same Day.  The 35 -54 tend to view less, but view in a more traditional manner,  except for time shifting their viewing, which is why the 18-49 is what is looked at currently.   This is not to say that  that older technophiles don't time shift or watch shows streaming online (I do both),  but generally it's those in the 50+ that watch in the traditional manner. Watch it when it's broadcast on broadcast networks.  As the younger demo abandoned traditional televison, the older group is dying off, hence the decline in traditional broadcast viewing.  

 

 

This subject matter is just so interesting. We are smack in the middle of amazing changing times in how our home entertainment is brought to us. Everything that was "normal" in our viewing habits/possibilities is in flux. Series like our favorite Thursday night half-hour will may soon be presented in an entirely different way.

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

 

 

In some ways it's interesting to me, that as TV's got bigger, viewing has increased on small computer screens.  Smart TVs (or something like Apple TV) are also changing that as those thing can bring the online shows to the big TV.  

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That is precisely why advertisers are starting to look at the 18-34 demo more closely. Those are the people that are more likely to watch in a non-traditional manner . Not just binging, but also quite a few have disconnected from cable, or at time shifting, so advertisers pay more for that demo for the Live + Same Day. The 35 -54 tend to view less, but view in a more traditional manner, except for time shifting their viewing, which is why the 18-49 is what is looked at currently. This is not to say that that older technophiles don't time shift or watch shows streaming online (I do both), but generally it's those in the 50+ that watch in the traditional manner. Watch it when it's broadcast on broadcast networks. As the younger demo abandoned traditional televison, the older group is dying off, hence the decline in traditional broadcast viewing.

In some ways it's interesting to me, that as TV's got bigger, viewing has increased on small computer screens. Smart TVs (or something like Apple TV) are also changing that as those thing can bring the online shows to the big TV.

AT my house, no under 25 watches the big screen for broadcast TV. They can watch Apple TV, Fetch, Oz Netflix, the catchup services, phones and laptops. They MAY watch the broadcast news. And none of them watch the repeats of TBBT AND I have to use gaffer tape to make them stay to watch new episodes. Usually they just leave the room whenever it is on, because it's passé. Lots more interesting things are out there for them. I did however recently find one child reading a book. WTH

Edited by Nogravitasatall
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The show is still winning it's time slot and that is all that really matters to the network and it's advertisers if the show starts losing it's time slot then that's when your start to worry we know we have 2 more seasons unless the ratings fall off completely we will get seasons 9 and 10

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The show is still winning it's time slot and that is all that really matters to the network and it's advertisers if the show starts losing it's time slot then that's when your start to worry we know we have 2 more seasons unless the ratings fall off completely we will get seasons 9 and 10

The lower ratings mean that advertisers will not be as willing to pay as much for slots, which could make Jim, Johnny and Kaley's $1m an episode salaries seem excessive and unjustified, and they could have to take a pay cut. It happened to the Simpsons a few years ago; it could happen to TBBT.

Edited by Stewie99
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The lower ratings mean that advertisers will not be as willing to pay as much for slots, which could make Jim, Johnny and Paley's $1m an episode salaries seem excessive and unjustified, and they could have to take a pay cut. It happened to the Simpsons a few years ago; it could happen to TBBT.

I think it would take a BIG drop-off in ratings for something like that to happen. Even with the drop in ratings that has happened recently, it's still the number one comedy, which means the advertisers are still going to be willing to pay whatever it takes to keep their ads in front of that many eyes.

The show would have to have a MAJOR drop in ratings to lose that top spot and that doesn't seem likely at this point.

Plus, ad rates for the first run episodes is not the only way that WB makes money off of the show.

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I think it would take a BIG drop-off in ratings for something like that to happen. Even with the drop in ratings that has happened recently, it's still the number one comedy, which means the advertisers are still going to be willing to pay whatever it takes to keep their ads in front of that many eyes.

The show would have to have a MAJOR drop in ratings to lose that top spot and that doesn't seem likely at this point.

Plus, ad rates for the first run episodes is not the only way that WB makes money off of the show.

 

You're absolutely right. Toss in the fact that all networks have steadily been losing ratings as more and more people turn to On Demand and Netflix as opposed to live TV and there you go.

 

The fact that TBBT does as well as it does in this day and age is incredible

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I think it would take a BIG drop-off in ratings for something like that to happen. Even with the drop in ratings that has happened recently, it's still the number one comedy, which means the advertisers are still going to be willing to pay whatever it takes to keep their ads in front of that many eyes.

Not true, ad revenue, for broadcast television is dropping, based on the lower numbers of people watching. In 2012-2013, the top nine non-sports shows brought in a combined 2.5 million per ad spot (the top three brought in 1.1 million). In 2013-2014 the average was 2.3 million for the top nine (with the top three at $950,000). This year, the top nine are pulling in 2.1 million (the top three are at $900,000). For the first time since 2000 (I can't find anything for before that) TBBT was the only show above $300,000 per ad spot, last year there were three. Advertisers pay for eyeballs that are watching, not relative to other shows. If the ratings go down, the ad rates go down. Production costs being equal, the lower rated show will usually be the one that gets cancelled. However, once you take production costs into account, if the ad revenue isn't enough to cover the licensing fee, that show won't be renewed.

If TBBT drops to the 4.4-4.5 demo for this year, I can see the ad rate dropping to the low $300,000, if not below that number due to overall decline of the ad prices. If TBBT's ad rate would drop to around $225.000 (something I can see happening towards the end of season 11), then the licensing fee would be more than the ad revenue, and at that point they would cancel the show. At this point it really doesn't matter as CBS has renewed the show through season 10, so they have to pay for production through season ten. I mentioned the ad price dropping to $225,000 in season 11. I can see CBS and WB exercising the reported one year extension on the actors contracts for season 11, but I think economics catches up with the show at that point (unless WB wants to give CBS a discount for the season 12 license, as WB would make more money through syndication).

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Ok all weekend I have been reading this back and fourth regarding the decrease in ratings and what that means. When it went into the direction of advertising revue I cannot help but comment.

I cannot stress to everyone that what you read are all based off LPM/overnight data only. There are 210 DMAs in the country and the majority of DMAs are calculated by a diary system. What this means is these markets are only sampled during sweeps 4 times a year. Is it as accurate as LPM/overnights no, but when you add in the diary markets the data is not always the same. The HH ratings and demos are much larger when the entire sweep for all 210 mkts are calculated.

And while advertisers aim for 1834 its a very difficult demo to deliver. Over 50% of buys both spot & network are still RA2554. All auto is this demo, majority of finance, certain retail, etc

Spot buys (aka buying local affiliates and not network ads) are still the bread & butter of how tv stations make money. Its very frustrating to buyers, station managers and sellers (aka me) when these national network rtgs and dollar totals go out because while its accurate it gives the general public not the whole picture of how money is made in this industry.

The largest markets in the country are LPM/overnights. These also tend the be more urban areas with heavy populations. These markets experience much higher levels of DVRing, etc than the medium-small size diary markets. In general diary markets watch more scheduled tv because of the style of their environment. This also effects the larger numbers.

I am not saying the tv environment hasn't changed. I don't believe the eyeballs have left, its just people are choosing to watch tv in different ways (aka binging) and on different devices that are not calculated in a Nielsen format. This is why the industry is starting to consider buying off impressions rather than ratings for both spot & network buys. Impressions will allow all venues of tv watching to be calculated the same.

Now one last note. I do not think viewing is altared by Kaley's hair, nor lacking Lenny plots, or anything like that. The mainstream viewers do not read into these things like we do. And they are the general public. Hell in fact some of those questioning all of this aren't even in the USA to be part of a NSI survey. So just remember what we love/hate so passionately about the show I bet your neighbors do not care to that level.

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Edited by kerrycec03
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