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Chit Chat: Season 11

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23 hours ago, Die Zimtzicke said:

Yes, they all had baggage. But the people who voted for Trump didn't care about his personal life and the people who approved of Bill Clinton probably didn't get out and vote for her because of him, while the people who dislike him did.  I totally agree Sander's base was more active, however when their activism came to naught, most of them probably stayed home. Actually probably close to  half the people eligible to vote did not. That has to change

 

I know one young woman in her 20's that does but her father is extremely wealthy and he has convinced her that Trump is doing wonderful things for them and that's all that matters. She is rather spoiled and nothing matters to her except what she gets and has.

Only one presidential candidate ever received more votes than Hillary Clinton:  Barack Obama in 2008.

That's it.

When the electoral college was set up, the population disparity between urban and rural areas was around 16 to 1.  It is now closer to 70 to 1.  It makes the distortions of the electoral college all the greater.  The voting power of people in Wyoming is significantly greater than those in California or Texas.

14 hours ago, Die Zimtzicke said:

Many people did not vote...not just some of Sander's young fans.

The electoral college suppresses voting turnout for both parties.

But overall voting numbers were high in '16.  The under 30 vote spiked in 2008, but fell back in 2012 and 2016.  

Edited by Capt. Hilts
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7 minutes ago, Capt. Hilts said:

When the electoral college was set up, the population disparity between urban and rural areas was around 16 to 1.  It is now closer to 70 to 1.  It makes the distortions of the electoral college all the greater.  The voting power of people in Wyoming is significantly greater than those in California or Texas.

That's true. If you took the number of citizens in a state to calculate the amount of electoral votes for the state, using Wyoming as baseline because it's the least populated state, California would get like 200 electoral votes

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This has been wonderful  but I think I'm going to stick to the season 12 chit chat now and stop going back and forth. Here's to a great year for everyone!

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25 minutes ago, Die Zimtzicke said:

This has been wonderful  but I think I'm going to stick to the season 12 chit chat now and stop going back and forth. Here's to a great year for everyone!

Ok. If it’s not raining on the s12 parade to ponder aloud about the current dilemma for the USA. I’ll jump.

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Teachers in England and Wales are employed for the whole year, regardless of when the holidays are. That way they can be expected to attend meetings, accompany children on overseas trips and attend courses when the school is closed.They're not expected to take on an extra job in order to make ends meet. 

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13 minutes ago, joyceraye said:

Teachers in England and Wales are employed for the whole year, regardless of when the holidays are. That way they can be expected to attend meetings, accompany children on overseas trips and attend courses when the school is closed.They're not expected to take on an extra job in order to make ends meet. 

The last day for teachers in my county in Florida (Hillsborough; includes the city of Tampa) was 5/29, and their first day back is 8/2.  I'm a middle school counselor, so I stay a little longer (last day 5/31), and come in earlier (first day 7/30).  That's approximately 2 months without pay.  Your options are to either have money taken out of your check during the school year so that you can get paid over the summer (the school district gets the interest while the money is sitting in the coffers, btw), get a summer job, or both.  Professional development trainings (which gives you the inservice credits required to renew a teaching certificate) are offered during the summer but typically are not paid.
Personally, I am in favor of the idea of year-round school.  One elementary school in my county did this for a few years.  Instead of having a 2 month break in the summer which results in "summer slide", they took a break in between each grading period.  This provides remediation for struggling students during the school year, and teachers who need the money volunteer to teach the courses. It didn't take off, and a lot of parents in that attendance area moved out of the area or opted out to magnet or charter schools because they had a hard time finding child care because the parents still had to work while the kid was off or the school schedule wasn't exactly custody agreement friendly. 

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3 hours ago, Carm6773 said:

Professional development trainings (which gives you the inservice credits required to renew a teaching certificate) are offered during the summer but typically are not paid.

In Alberta and British Columbia (Canada) teachers get paid PD days spread out during the regular school year and students stay home on those days.

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3 hours ago, Carm6773 said:

The last day for teachers in my county in Florida (Hillsborough; includes the city of Tampa) was 5/29, and their first day back is 8/2.  I'm a middle school counselor, so I stay a little longer (last day 5/31), and come in earlier (first day 7/30).  That's approximately 2 months without pay. 

This is, quite frankly, crazy.

Is that widespread in the US or is that done in republican states/districts?

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5 hours ago, joyceraye said:

Teachers in England and Wales are employed for the whole year, regardless of when the holidays are. That way they can be expected to attend meetings, accompany children on overseas trips and attend courses when the school is closed.They're not expected to take on an extra job in order to make ends meet. 

Same here.  I don’t think a lot people outside the USA, or inside it, realise how tough the USA customs and traditions can be on the workers. 

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1 hour ago, djsurrey said:

In Alberta and British Columbia (Canada) teachers get paid PD days spread out during the regular school year and students stay home on those days.

Similar here. It used to be the case that all courses teachers attended were after school hours and at weekends or in the holidays. About 25 years ago in order to show that teachers were working more hours so they could be paid more, 'Baker' days were introduced,named after the Secretary of State for Education at the time. Four  'occasional 'days which were flexible holidays chosen by the school were replaced by INSET - In-Service Education and Training - days. The children still get their days off but teachers go in. Teaching qualifications don't have to be renewed. Somebody who'd been out of the profession for a number of years might go on a refresher course before returning if they were hoping to get a job.

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1 hour ago, son-goku5 said:

This is, quite frankly, crazy.

Is that widespread in the US or is that done in republican states/districts?

That's the way it is in the US;  I think there is a mandate that states that a school year has to be at least 180 days.   Some states don't go back until Early September but they don't get out until Mid or Late June.  

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37 minutes ago, Carm6773 said:

That's the way it is in the US;  I think there is a mandate that states that a school year has to be at least 180 days.   Some states don't go back until Early September but they don't get out until Mid or Late June.  

USA isn’t homogenously a first world country.  In infrastructure, policy or social structures. That isn’t at all apparent from the glossy fictional stories we outside the USA get to consume, or from the news that comes out. Those actual norms (that’s the way it is... ) have to be lived, I think. I keep getting surprised.

Edited by Nogravitasatall
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USA isn’t homogenously a first world country.  In infrastructure, policy or social structures. That it isn’t at all apparent from the glossy fictional stories we outside the USA get to consume, or from the news that comes out. Those actual norms (that’s the way it is... ) have to be lived, I think. I keep getting surprised.
It's strange a lot of times but you get used to it. I don't know what to do now besides vote in November and hope for the best. if not it may be time for me to sailing again

Sent from my SM-G930P using Tapatalk

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7 hours ago, Carm6773 said:

That's the way it is in the US;  I think there is a mandate that states that a school year has to be at least 180 days.   Some states don't go back until Early September but they don't get out until Mid or Late June.  

Here in Germany, school holidays vary throughout the states, some states have them earlier but all states have the same days. But while our teachers aren't that well paid either, none needs to look for a summer job because they aren't getting paid for two months...

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On 7/24/2018 at 7:45 AM, son-goku5 said:

Here in Germany, school holidays vary throughout the states, some states have them earlier but all states have the same days. But while our teachers aren't that well paid either, none needs to look for a summer job because they aren't getting paid for two months...

Some years ago I was staying with a friend during August in Nord Rhein Westfalen.  I was surprised to hear an announcement that local schools would be closed because of the high temperatures. That was the first time I had any idea any schools in the northern hemisphere were open during August. Naive or what ? My only experience of school closure until then was when heating systems broke down in the winter. :)

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51 minutes ago, joyceraye said:

Some years ago I was staying with a friend during August in Nord Rhein Westfalen.  I was surprised to hear an announcement that local schools would be closed because of the high temperatures. That was the first time I had any idea any schools in the northern hemisphere were open during August. Naive or what ? My only experience of school closure until then was when heating systems broke down in the winter. :)

In my state, Brandenburg, summer vacation in 2018 is from July 5th to August 18th. And since summers sometimes go into September, schools regularly either close completely for a hot day or the periods are shortened from 45 minutes to 35 minutes

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2 hours ago, joyceraye said:

My only experience of school closure until then was when heating systems broke down in the winter. :)

When I was a kid it was typically blizzard conditions that would lead to school closures. (Edmonton Alberta). It only happened infrequently although when I was a kid we often had snow on the ground from mid October until late April. Another snow storm in May was quite common.

We get much less snow where I live now on the west coast but closures are somewhat more frequent many winters. It seems strange but the odd time it snows at all the population is not really prepared and fresh snow is very slick near zero degrees C. Hills become a problem. An unexpected snow fall during a weekday rush can wreak  havok here. A similar event in relatively flat much colder Edmonton would be barely noticed.

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My experiences are..umm.. different. I never experienced a closure for weather, but when I was IIRC 10 they thought Iraq might bomb us. We took our gas masks to school with us and very few children came so we mostly watched movies. It wasn't for too long, maybe about one or two weeks.

ETA: For those who are confused by that, well... life in Israel.

Edited by bfm
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In Florida, we close for tropical storms or hurricanes.  We were closed for a week when Irma came through.  

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5 hours ago, Carm6773 said:

In Florida, we close for tropical storms or hurricanes.  We were closed for a week when Irma came through.  

Do the teachers lose pay ?

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14 hours ago, bfm said:

My experiences are..umm.. different. I never experienced a closure for weather, but when I was IIRC 10 they thought Iraq might bomb us. We took our gas masks to school with us and very few children came so we mostly watched movies. It wasn't for too long, maybe about one or two weeks.

ETA: For those who are confused by that, well... life in Israel.

Not confused (except by icons on iPads) - it just sucks.

I. Have. No. Idea.

I live in such a safe space. Miscreants can’t walk here. Only North Korea might aim missiles at me. I know pretty much where the sharks, coneshells, stonefish, crocs, spiders, snakes & gun-nuts hang out (practically, no one here has a gun), so I can avoid them. I can swim, and can read a rip at the beach. I know not to go too close to a cliff. I have a smoke alarm, earth leakage detectors on the house circuits and I and everyone here habitually wear seatbelts. I’m vaccinated (even against smallpox). I have publicly funded lifesaving medical.  I use sunblock and don’t smoke.  And I have a non-slip bathtub.

I. Have. No. Idea. Really

Edit: and if I run out of petrol, I’m unlikely to die from heat or cold.

Edited by Nogravitasatall
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4 hours ago, Nogravitasatall said:

Not confused (except by icons on iPads) - it just sucks.

I. Have. No. Idea.

I live in such a safe space. Miscreants can’t walk here. Only North Korea might aim missiles at me. I know pretty much where the sharks, coneshells, stonefish, crocs, spiders, snakes & gun-nuts hang out (practically, no one here has a gun), so I can avoid them. I can swim, and can read a rip at the beach. I know not to go too close to a cliff. I have a smoke alarm, earth leakage detectors on the house circuits and I and everyone here habitually wear seatbelts. I’m vaccinated (even against smallpox). I have publicly funded lifesaving medical.  I use sunblock and don’t smoke.  And I have a non-slip bathtub.

I. Have. No. Idea. Really

Edit: and if I run out of petrol, I’m unlikely to die from heat or cold.

I'm glad you have no idea :) I hope one day it will be like this for everybody. 

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23 hours ago, joyceraye said:

Do the teachers lose pay ?

We got paid a week early, but then we had to make up the time.

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On 7/25/2018 at 4:59 AM, bfm said:

My experiences are..umm.. different. I never experienced a closure for weather, but when I was IIRC 10 they thought Iraq might bomb us. We took our gas masks to school with us and very few children came so we mostly watched movies. It wasn't for too long, maybe about one or two weeks.

ETA: For those who are confused by that, well... life in Israel.

I guess there is some difference between living at or near the crossroads of civilization and at the "ends of the earth."

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3 hours ago, djsurrey said:

I guess there is some difference between living at or near the crossroads of civilization and at the "ends of the earth."

Oz doesn't have bears or mountain lions either, so simple bushwalking isn't always a life and death issue, as long as you respect the heat/cold and carry maps and water.   I saw the bear-proof bins in Canada! Aren't hikers just snacks?

If you drive west from the east or east from the west you need to prep - perhaps carry water and food and maybe spares - as  you might not get passed by a car for days, or weeks if you get off the major routes  - but if you go there you should research. Travellers might not appreciate that away from the fringe of east coast the population density goes way down. And in the tropics any body of water may have a croc in it.

But nobody is, as policy, shooting at anyone. Are we missing out?

 

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