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[Spoilers] Season 12 Discussion Thread

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4 hours ago, MTBigBangTheoryFan said:

Yes

Thanks for the info!

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18 hours ago, Silver1984 said:

Amy tries to hold it together for both of them, but the atmosphere is tense. They are both still devastated.

I'm relieved to hear that–not that I want them to be miserable, but I think it's a more in depth look into Amy's character to have her try to keep it together, rather than have her get over it or not be bothered and become annoyed by Sheldon moping (which is what they've done in the past) For me, Amy needs the encouragement from the tape as much as sheldon does, which sets it apart from similar storylines. And of course I'm glad they'll still be working together. 

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Sheldon always goes overboard with his reactions as Leonard always over thinks things.

Edited by chucky

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On 11/27/2018 at 4:10 PM, April said:

No, it has been mentioned as early as S4E20 by Sheldon:

Sheldon: Mm, it’s hard to say. I can only speculate based on the data I collected watching my parents’ marriage implode. In that case, the woman dives into religion, while the man dives into a bottle-blonde bartender who tries to buy my love with action figures.

Makes it sound like they were separated at the time, not like he made it sound when explaining the knock

On 11/27/2018 at 4:10 PM, April said:

 

 

On 11/27/2018 at 7:01 PM, Kev0821 said:

Michael Ausiello is a friend of the show and has been covering it for years. Therefore, I thought the article was worth sharing.

"Friend of the show" usually equals sycophant to TPTB

On 11/28/2018 at 12:18 PM, Chrismo said:

What’s annoying besides the storyline to begin with is that it could of been done in one episode.

They were but they couldn’t find Penny’s pink bra

Yeah now that was a nice Christmas present 😍

2qlPjC1.gif

Edited by JE7
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14 minutes ago, JE7 said:

Makes it sound like they were separated at the time, not like he made it sound when explaining the knock

 

"Friend of the show" usually equals sycophant to TPTB

Yeah now that was a nice Christmas present 😍

2qlPjC1.gif

Yeahhh!

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21 hours ago, chucky said:

Thank you. I guess that means more reruns on Thursday Night!

It also means a big gap for viewers in other countries. The channel that shows US sitcoms in UK starts showing TBBT later in each season so that they can catch up by Christmas. We had episode  1207 tonight. They're already advertising what they'll show once we draw level. Then we'll have to wait until February in order to finish near the  same time in May. I've never understood why in the USA they don't show a new episode every week. They used to skip weeks with Frasier and Bones too.

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6 hours ago, joyceraye said:

I've never understood why in the USA they don't show a new episode every week.

I agree!

Edited by Tensor
Removed now hidden quote and answer.
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5 minutes ago, joyceraye said:

It also means a big gap for viewers in other countries. The channel that shows US sitcoms in UK starts showing TBBT later in each season so that they can catch up by Christmas. We had episode  1207 tonight. They're already advertising what they'll show once we draw level. Then we'll have to wait until February in order to finish near the  same time in May. I've never understood why in the USA they don't show a new episode every week. They used to skip weeks with Frasier and Bones too.

I believe they film only 24 episodes a year.  The programming runs about seven months, so it would not be possible to film that many episodes.  Think @tensor would be able to verify this

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25 minutes ago, Mario D. said:

I believe they film only 24 episodes a year.  The programming runs about seven months, so it would not be possible to film that many episodes.  Think @tensor would be able to verify this

Yes, they make 24 episodes and show them over eight months instead of five and a half. What puzzles me is why they do that. I don't know of any other country that does anything similar.

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Just now, joyceraye said:

Yes, they make 24 episodes and show them over eight months instead of five and a half. What puzzles me is why they do that. I don't know of any other country that does anything similar.

The regular broadcast season runs mid September until mid May.  TBBT sets up it's broadcast schedule to insure the most eyes on the screen as possible each time a new episode airs.  So they observe the calendar and what the competition is producing to determine when to air new and when to air a rerun.

Some examples: if a holiday falls on a Thursday they will air a rerun.  They won't go up against major sporting events like The Winter Olympics.  They'll reserve chunks of new episodes for "sweeps " weeks.  They don't air at all during the NCAA basketball tournament in March which airs on CBS. If a competitor has special programming against their time slot, they will air a rerun.....etc.

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26 minutes ago, joyceraye said:

 I've never understood why in the USA they don't show a new episode every week. They used to skip weeks with Frasier and Bones too.

 

17 minutes ago, Mario D. said:

I believe they film only 24 episodes a year.  The programming runs about seven months, so it would not be possible to film that many episodes.  Think @tensor would be able to verify this

In the US, the trend has been for fewer and fewer episodes .   In the early days of television, the season ran from the first week of September (maybe even the last week of October) to the last week of May (maybe to the first week of June).   This means there were 39 weeks in a television season.  In the fifties, if you take out  Thanksgiving week, and Christmas and New Years weeks, you have 36 weeks, and the shows back then made 36 new episodes each season.   I Love Lucy and other early programs ran this many episodes (The Honeymooners ran for 39 their one season).  

This kind of schedule is brutal to the actors and crew (hour long shows were working up to 14 hour days to keep ahead of the broadcast schedule).  A series of new contracts over the years now limit half hour shows (Like the Big Bang) to four production weeks, in six weeks.  That's one reason for the two on one off production schedule.   Since there are six periods of six weeks during the season (36 weeks in a season), and you can produce four episodes during those six weeks, that's 24 episodes (4 shows during six periods) during the season.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Tensor said:

 

In the US, the trend has been for fewer and fewer episodes .   In the early days of television, the season ran from the first week of September (maybe even the last week of October) to the last week of May (maybe to the first week of June).   This means there were 39 weeks in a television season.  In the fifties, if you take out  Thanksgiving week, and Christmas and New Years weeks, you have 36 weeks, and the shows back then made 36 new episodes each season.   I Love Lucy and other early programs ran this many episodes (The Honeymooners ran for 39 their one season).  

This kind of schedule is brutal to the actors and crew (hour long shows were working up to 14 hour days to keep ahead of the broadcast schedule).  A series of new contracts over the years now limit half hour shows (Like the Big Bang) to four production weeks, in six weeks.  That's one reason for the two on one off production schedule.   Since there are six periods of six weeks during the season (36 weeks in a season), and you can produce four episodes during those six weeks, that's 24 episodes (4 shows during six periods) during the season.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1 hour ago, Tensor said:

 

In the US, the trend has been for fewer and fewer episodes .   In the early days of television, the season ran from the first week of September (maybe even the last week of October) to the last week of May (maybe to the first week of June).   This means there were 39 weeks in a television season.  In the fifties, if you take out  Thanksgiving week, and Christmas and New Years weeks, you have 36 weeks, and the shows back then made 36 new episodes each season.   I Love Lucy and other early programs ran this many episodes (The Honeymooners ran for 39 their one season).  

This kind of schedule is brutal to the actors and crew (hour long shows were working up to 14 hour days to keep ahead of the broadcast schedule).  A series of new contracts over the years now limit half hour shows (Like the Big Bang) to four production weeks, in six weeks.  That's one reason for the two on one off production schedule.   Since there are six periods of six weeks during the season (36 weeks in a season), and you can produce four episodes during those six weeks, that's 24 episodes (4 shows during six periods) during the season.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interesting. I love history. Thank you. We have programmes here that run three or more times a week and never have breaks for repeats. They don't skip weeks for holidays, in fact they're more likely to have a double episode. I imagine  they prevent exhaustion by not using the same actors every time. If there's a big enough cast they don't all have to appear in every episode. 

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48 minutes ago, joyceraye said:

 

Interesting. I love history. Thank you. We have programmes here that run three or more times a week and never have breaks for repeats. They don't skip weeks for holidays, in fact they're more likely to have a double episode. I imagine  they prevent exhaustion by not using the same actors every time. If there's a big enough cast they don't all have to appear in every episode. 

There's still wear and tear on the crew!

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2 hours ago, Tensor said:

 

In the US, the trend has been for fewer and fewer episodes .   In the early days of television, the season ran from the first week of September (maybe even the last week of October) to the last week of May (maybe to the first week of June).   This means there were 39 weeks in a television season.  In the fifties, if you take out  Thanksgiving week, and Christmas and New Years weeks, you have 36 weeks, and the shows back then made 36 new episodes each season.   I Love Lucy and other early programs ran this many episodes (The Honeymooners ran for 39 their one season).  

This kind of schedule is brutal to the actors and crew (hour long shows were working up to 14 hour days to keep ahead of the broadcast schedule).  A series of new contracts over the years now limit half hour shows (Like the Big Bang) to four production weeks, in six weeks.  That's one reason for the two on one off production schedule.   Since there are six periods of six weeks during the season (36 weeks in a season), and you can produce four episodes during those six weeks, that's 24 episodes (4 shows during six periods) during the season.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks tensor  Knew you would have a definitive answer to the question.     Also, didn't shows like Ozzie & Harriet  and My Three Sons film 31 or 32 episodes yearly and that is why they have more than 300 episodes in their history

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1 minute ago, chucky said:

There's still wear and tear on the crew!

I suppose it depends on the hours the crew has to work.  If they do six hours a day for five days a week it won't matter to them which programme they're filming.

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4 minutes ago, Mario D. said:

Thanks tensor  Knew you would have a definitive answer to the question.     Also, didn't shows like Ozzie & Harriet  and My Three Sons film 31 or 32 episodes yearly and that is why they have more than 300 episodes in their history

I suppose if audiences are accustomed to such a lengthy season for historical reasons, and seeing it the same way year after year, they must like it that way. With the exception of  a few that are on all year round, our seasons ( we don't call them that ) tend to run in  six or thirteen - week  blocks ( we call them series )  but that can vary . Once they start being shown they keep going and aren't usually interrupted.

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1 hour ago, Mario D. said:

Thanks tensor  Knew you would have a definitive answer to the question.     Also, didn't shows like Ozzie & Harriet  and My Three Sons film 31 or 32 episodes yearly and that is why they have more than 300 episodes in their history

Yes, they did.  That's why while TBBT will be tied for second most seasons ran,  but only be the fourth most episodes.    In terms of seasons, the top five are:

14  The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet  1952-1966

12  My Three Sons          1960-1972

12  Two and A Half Men    2003-2015

12 The Big Bang Theory   2007-2019

11  There are eight series tied here.    (Three ran from the 70s to the 80, four ran from the 80s to the 90s, one from the 50s to the 60s,  

Interesting point, , with the revival, if Murphy Brown gets renewed for next year, it will make it to 12 seasons.  1988 to 1998

As far as episodes, the top five (to the end of this year) are

1   435 episodes   The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriette    1952-1966    (Averaged 31.0 per year)

2   380 episodes   My Three Sons          1960-972       (31.5 per year)

3   344 episodes   The Danny Thomas Show     1953-1964  11 seasons   (31.2 per year)

4   291 episodes   The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show  1950-1958  8 seasons ( 36.4)

5   276 episodes   The Big Bang Theory      2007-2019      12 seasons  (23 per year)

 

Note that two of the longest running, by seasons, are not on the episode list.  If the next five are included, only two of the eight tied for #5 for seasons, make it to the top ten episode list (Two and A Half Men, doesn't make the top ten in episodes).   And to give your some idea about the number of episodes that used to get made, The Big Bang Theory would have to run for another 6 and a half seasons  (basically run for 19 seasons) to pass Ozzie and Harriet in episode count.   Or, looks at George and Gracie, eight seasons, and TBBT won't pass that show in episodes after 12 years.    

 

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 I have in no way criticized the person who gave us spoilers and who did the write-up. I was merely answering to the poster who asked for an elaboration on the Shamy plot. If he/she had read the taping report more closely he/she would have discovered that the taping report is a very detailed description of the Shamy plot because it is the "a" plot. As simple as that.

6 hours ago, chucky said:

I don't think he criticized the poster. He stated an opinion on the upcoming episode on the information given. No disrespect was given to the poster, in my opinion.

Thank you, chucky, that is exactly it.

Edited by Tensor
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3 hours ago, Tensor said:

Yes, they did.  That's why while TBBT will be tied for second most seasons ran,  but only be the fourth most episodes.    In terms of seasons, the top five are:

14  The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet  1952-1966

12  My Three Sons          1960-1972

12  Two and A Half Men    2003-2015

12 The Big Bang Theory   2007-2019

11  There are eight series tied here.    (Three ran from the 70s to the 80, four ran from the 80s to the 90s, one from the 50s to the 60s,  

Interesting point, , with the revival, if Murphy Brown gets renewed for next year, it will make it to 12 seasons.  1988 to 1998

As far as episodes, the top five (to the end of this year) are

1   435 episodes   The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriette    1952-1966    (Averaged 31.0 per year)

2   380 episodes   My Three Sons          1960-972       (31.5 per year)

3   344 episodes   The Danny Thomas Show     1953-1964  11 seasons   (31.2 per year)

4   291 episodes   The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show  1950-1958  8 seasons ( 36.4)

5   276 episodes   The Big Bang Theory      2007-2019      12 seasons  (23 per year)

 

Note that two of the longest running, by seasons, are not on the episode list.  If the next five are included, only two of the eight tied for #5 for seasons, make it to the top ten episode list (Two and A Half Men, doesn't make the top ten in episodes).   And to give your some idea about the number of episodes that used to get made, The Big Bang Theory would have to run for another 6 and a half seasons  (basically run for 19 seasons) to pass Ozzie and Harriet in episode count.   Or, looks at George and Gracie, eight seasons, and TBBT won't pass that show in episodes after 12 years.    

 

Gunsmoke was on the air for 20 season and had 635 episodes. The first 10 seasons had 34-39 episodes per season.  The first five seasons had 39 episodes each.   

It took The Simpsons 29 seasons to get to 635 episodes. Law & Order: SVU now in its 20th seasons is not even close to 635 Episodes yet. Sor far it 's only had 443. 

Edited by MTBigBangTheoryFan
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I was trying to compare apples to apples by staying away from the hour long programs and just compare TBBT to other half hour comedies.  

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3 hours ago, Carlos said:

 I have in no way criticized the person who gave us spoilers and who did the write-up. I was merely answering to the poster who asked for an elaboration on the Shamy plot. If he/she had read the taping report more closely he/she would have discovered that the taping report is a very detailed description of the Shamy plot because it is the "a" plot. As simple as that.

Thank you, chucky, that is exactly it.

Very glad to hear this. It appeared in my email without context.

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6 hours ago, joyceraye said:

I suppose it depends on the hours the crew has to work.  If they do six hours a day for five days a week it won't matter to them which programme they're filming.

Yeah, but from what I hear it could be days with a lot longer than 6 hours.

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1 hour ago, MTBigBangTheoryFan said:

Gunsmoke was on the air for 20 season and had 635 episodes. The first 10 seasons had 34-39 episodes per season.  The first five seasons had 39 episodes each.   

It took The Simpsons 29 seasons to get to 635 episodes. Law & Order: SVU now in its 20th seasons is not even close to 635 Episodes yet. Sor far it 's only had 443. 

Good ole Gunsmoke. One of my cable channels shows it but in colour. When we first got  TV around 1957 it was being shown in our region - central England - but renamed 'Gun Law' although it was still 'Gunsmoke' on Radio Luxembourg. It was long gone by the time colour TV was available in UK some ten years later. I suppose we had more programmes of our own by then. I'm still surprised  not to see it (and Bonanza which is on cable too )  in black and white, LOL.

 

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