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Season 12 Chit Chat Thread


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On 10/11/2018 at 7:08 PM, son-goku5 said:

I read Uncle Tom's Cabin and Huck Finn as a child. I could never make the connection to slavery because at that point, I hadn't learned about it yet in school.

But still, as derogatory as the word nigger is, replacing it with slave makes it worse.

AS D.L. Hughley so aptly put it: "If you call me nigger, I can go home. If you call me slave, I have to go with you."

That's an interesting point. The slaves I learned about early on in my schooldays would have been white anyway. To us, 'nigger' was a shade of fabric or paint, or somebody with brown skin in Geography lessons or dolls, as we never saw one in real life. There was no implication that anybody would be insulted by the word. People who'd fought alongside them in the word  wars never said so.   We learned about slaves when we'd studied the Romans, the Greeks, and the story of Pope Gregory sending St Augustine to re-Christianise the British Isles after seeing beautiful blue eyed blonde Angles being  sold in the slave market. When we did Patron Saints we learned about St Patrick.  And of course in Scripture lessons we learned about Joseph being sold to slave traders  on their way to Egypt. We learned how we got rid of our criminals in the 16th and 17th century by sending them as slaves to the colonies, including America, to work for the settlers as an alternative punishment to hanging. That would be before merchants thought of buying and capturing African ones to sell to Americans . We eventually learned of the 18th and 19th century anti-slavery campaigns by missionaries in Africa and the abolition of the transatlantic slave trade by the British Parliament when the Royal Navy thought it was the boss of the seas. (Britannia, rule the waves ! Britons never shall be slaves !) I suppose studying Finn and Sawyer and Uncle Tom's Cabin  might have dovetailed in with  something we were doing in history. If the word 'slave' had been used then in the books the chances are at that age I would have pictured a white man. 

Edited by joyceraye
clarifying words

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7 hours ago, joyceraye said:

I suppose studying Finn and Sawyer and Uncle Tom's Cabin  might have dovetailed in with  something we were doing in history. If the word 'slave' had been used then in the books the chances are at that age I would have pictured a white man. 

Some historians believe that Uncle Tom's cabin laid the groundwork for the Civil War. That's because the Northerners in the US couldn't quite fathom what a slave experienced bar those few who escaped and made it up there to tell their story. But when that book came out, which became at that time the second-bestselling book after the bible, many woke up to the fact how their fellow Americans treated black people.

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4 hours ago, son-goku5 said:

Some historians believe that Uncle Tom's cabin laid the groundwork for the Civil War.

When Abraham Lincoln met the author of the book, Harriet Beecher Stowe, in November 1862, he supposedly greeted her with the comment: “So you are the little woman who wrote the book that started this great war.” But I never found any evidence that the story has definitely been proven.  Most of Stowe's biographers have included some version of the quote, but in researching it, most historians agree that it is part of Stowe family tradition, without any textual support or known verification from the author herself.

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12 minutes ago, Die Zimtzicke said:

When Abraham Lincoln met the author of the book, Harriet Beecher Stowe, in November 1862, he supposedly greeted her with the comment: “So you are the little woman who wrote the book that started this great war.” But I never found any evidence that the story has definitely been proven.  Most of Stowe's biographers have included some version of the quote, but in researching it, most historians agree that it is part of Stowe family tradition, without any textual support or known verification from the author herself.

I also don't believe that this book alone caused the war. But I do think that it laid its groundwork by swelling resentment in the north against slavery while the south wanted to keep them.

Lets not forget that from the northern perspective, the war wasn't started because of slavery. The north fought for reunification (even though many people knew already that it was really about slavery). That changed in 1863 with the emanzipation proclamation.

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8 hours ago, son-goku5 said:

Lets not forget that from the northern perspective, the war wasn't started because of slavery. The north fought for reunification (even though many people knew already that it was really about slavery). That changed in 1863 with the emanzipation proclamation.

I used to be a Civil War reenactor.  One of the biggest problems we had was convincing people that when Lincoln was elected he had no intention of interfering with slavery where it existed. But he did intend to fight the extension of slavery into the territories and southerners knew that would make the slave-holding states a minority eventually. They honestly felt they had the right to secede. Granted, slavery quickly became inextricably entwined with the south's cry for state's rights, against the power of the federal government over the states, the South's  agricultural way of life vs. the northern industrial way of life, etc.  The economics of slavery and political control of that system were what was most central to the conflict.

P.S. i will always regret forgetting to put on my wire rimmed glasses when I got to the site where this pic was taken, but the pic is quite a happy memory of my younger days.

scan0008.jpg

Edited by Die Zimtzicke
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On 10/12/2018 at 3:51 PM, Die Zimtzicke said:

P.S. i will always regret forgetting to put on my wire rimmed glasses when I got to the site where this pic was taken, but the pic is quite a happy memory of my younger days.

Sheldon would scold you about the Error in glasses. For him. everything must be period correct! Remember his rant about Penny's blond hair in the Wonder Woman Costume.  😏

Edited by chucky
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  • 4 weeks later...

A couple of hours ago, I watched House of Cards. I'm not that interested in it but Marc * likes it. Anyroad, there was a scene where a man went into a restaurant and ordered shepherd's pie and sprouts.

Yuck, sprouts.

* My friend who I live with. 

 

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23 minutes ago, Strawberry said:

A couple of hours ago, I watched House of Cards. I'm not that interested in it but Marc * likes it. Anyroad, there was a scene where a man went into a restaurant and ordered shepherd's pie and sprouts.

Yuck, sprouts.

* My friend who I live with. 

 

Was that the original version of House of Cards or the American one ?

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6 hours ago, Strawberry said:

A couple of hours ago, I watched House of Cards. I'm not that interested in it but Marc * likes it. Anyroad, there was a scene where a man went into a restaurant and ordered shepherd's pie and sprouts.

Yuck, sprouts.

* My friend who I live with. 

 

Yuck
I hate peas and sprouts, y'all...

Edited by Carm6773
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1 hour ago, Strawberry said:

A couple of hours ago, I watched House of Cards. I'm not that interested in it but Marc * likes it. Anyroad, there was a scene where a man went into a restaurant and ordered shepherd's pie and sprouts.

Yuck, sprouts.

* My friend who I live with. 

 

I'm with you there!  The last time I had "sprouts" from Brussels, I was 10 years old (1967!) and had dinner at a friend's house.  They were a very cosmopolitan family (I had a ride home with him in a chauffeur driven Bentley once!) and told my mom how much I hated them and she never made me eat them again!

 

....and hello to Marc!!!!

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25 minutes ago, hokie3457 said:

I'm with you there!  The last time I had "sprouts" from Brussels, I was 10 years old (1967!) and had dinner at a friend's house.  They were a very cosmopolitan family (I had a ride home with him in a chauffeur driven Bentley once!) and told my mom how much I hated them and she never made me eat them again!

Oh, I love that tastes are so different, because I really love Brussels sprouts! Besides, I would also love a Bentley. 😄

Edited by veejay
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10 minutes ago, veejay said:

Oh, I love that tastes are so different, because I really love Brussels sprouts! Besides, I would also love a Bentley. 😄

It was very odd having the chauffeur open the door for me, even though I was 10!!! 

My friend and his siblings inherited a nice sum and run an organization that helps birds near the seashore in California, about an hour south of Pasadena, btw....

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4 minutes ago, son-goku5 said:

What's so bad about sprouts? Though as a child, I usually didn't want to eat them too but now, I gobble them down when they're on my plate ^^

Perhaps it is time to try them again.  My mom always would say "maybe your taste buds have changed"!!!!

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3 hours ago, son-goku5 said:

What's so bad about sprouts? Though as a child, I usually didn't want to eat them too but now, I gobble them down when they're on my plate ^^

 

8 minutes ago, chucky said:

My wife puts them in fresh lumpia. God, they're so good!!

I used to hate Brussel Sprouts. But if cooked properly, they're quite tasty!

 

2 hours ago, hokie3457 said:

Perhaps it is time to try them again.  My mom always would say "maybe your taste buds have changed"!!!!

If your earliest experience of 'Brussels' as they're often called in the English midlands ( although my mother always called them 'sprouts' ) is eating fresh produce from a winter crop that's unfortunately been subjected to frost and allowed somehow into the shops, you'll possibly be put off them for years. ( This can also happen with root vegetables that get frostbitten too near the surface. )  They'll be bitter and strong-tasting and you'll hate them. Uggh ! That is what happened to me. Once I discovered normal-tasting ones I loved them ! I buy frozen or tinned ones now, knowing they've been specially picked. They're nice with fish and chips as a change from mushy peas.

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26 minutes ago, Tensor said:

I like getting fresh ones, cut them in half, then coat them with olive oil, add some garlic and lightly salt, then broil.   

Now I've got an great appetite on that, and that at 8 am. Ooh...

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26 minutes ago, Tensor said:

I like getting fresh ones, cut them in half, then coat them with olive oil, add some garlic and lightly salt, then broil.   

Oh yum ! 

4 minutes ago, veejay said:

Now I've got an great appetite on that, and that at 8 am. Ooh...

That's fine ! 'Bubble and Squeak' is a popular breakfast dish here. Mix cabbage or sprouts with mashed potato and grill ( US ' broil' I think?) until brown. I do mine in the microwave. It's delicious on its own or with bacon and egg. Some people save the mashed potato and green veg from dinner the night before. You can buy it ready-made too.

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