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Season 12 Chit Chat Thread


Tensor
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10 hours ago, bfm said:

Here you go:

As you see, they don't have holes in the middle. It's a fried yeast pastry. The "classic" one is the one filled with strawberry jam that has suger pouder on top (the top left ones in this picture), but over the last decades more and more different types have appeared. 

Oh, that's a new insight for me, too. Here (in Germany) they are also available throughout the year (but not in so many delicious variations!) without a direct reference to Christmas, I think. They also have very different names nationwide, e.g. "Krapfen" (donut) or "Kräppel“, also "Berliner".
Fun fact: in Berlin (city) they are only called "Pfannkuchen" (pancake).
Anyway, I've always been a sweet tooth and would like them all. :icon_redface:

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One year I went down to the grocer's to pay my bill ( this was before online shopping) on  December 27th  after they'd been closed on Christmas Day and Boxing Day. A van was just pulling way and the grocer's lad was swearing because some firm had just delivered the Easter eggs.

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It makes sense that there'd be similar stuff in countries(/neighborhoods that are identified with countries) like Germany and Poland. Ashkenazi Jews came from these places and were in power positions when in the early days of Israel. Some Israeli customs, foods originate from these countries. I don't know if Sefardi Jews had these donuts in the countries they came from, I know Morrocans have something called sfinge that is considered as "the Morrocan donuts", but not about others. I'll have to ask my Sefardi grandma if she remember having them as a kid, before comming to Israel.

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15 hours ago, Die Zimtzicke said:

We have a donut like that with jam in the middle but it's called a Paczki (pronounced poonch-key) and sold before Lent in Polish neighborhoods. The day before Ash Wednesday is Paczki day. People line up for ages to get them.

We have something like that and it's called Pfannkuchen (pancake). Though they're available all year ^^

What americans know as pancakes, in Germany those are called Plinse.

On 11/28/2018 at 8:33 AM, veejay said:

Oh, that's a new insight for me, too. Here (in Germany) they are also available throughout the year (but not in so many delicious variations!) without a direct reference to Christmas, I think. They also have very different names nationwide, e.g. "Krapfen" (donut) or "Kräppel“, also "Berliner".
Fun fact: in Berlin (city) they are only called "Pfannkuchen" (pancake).
Anyway, I've always been a sweet tooth and would like them all. :icon_redface:

Given how many types of food are named after citizens of cities, people might imply, that we Germans are all cannibals. We have Frankfurter, Berliner and Hamburger and sometimes we even eat people from Poland, the Krakauer or Austria, the Wiener both in sausage and schnitzel form 😄

Edited by son-goku5

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5 hours ago, son-goku5 said:

Given how many types of food are named after citizens of cities, people might imply, that we Germans are all cannibals. We have Frankfurter, Berliner and Hamburger

We had similar food items when I was growing up in the 60s.   But parts of my family came from eastern Europe (Prussia, Eastern Germany, and Western Poland), and the differences in the dietary habits of poor Jewish families, and poor non-Jewish families, in that region, wasn't all that great.    

Those of my family, from that area, evidently also had canabalistic leanings, but in the form of specific people.  What you called a Berliner, we called a Bismarck, as in Otto von.  

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1 hour ago, Tensor said:

We had similar food items when I was growing up in the 60s.   But parts of my family came from eastern Europe (Prussia, Eastern Germany, and Western Poland), and the differences in the dietary habits of poor Jewish families, and poor non-Jewish families, in that region, wasn't all that great.    

Those of my family, from that area, evidently also had canabalistic leanings, but in the form of specific people.  What you called a Berliner, we called a Bismarck, as in Otto von.  

I'm impressed. The fact that you can trace your family back to the first German chancellor leads me (as a German) to the conclusion: "You're one of us, one of us!"  :shy:
Btw. today I am culinary only familiar with the Bismarck - Her(r)ing.

Edited by veejay

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39 minutes ago, veejay said:

I'm impressed. The fact that you can trace your family back to the first German chancellor leads me (as a German) to the conclusion: "You're one of us, one of us!"  :shy:
Btw. today I am culinary only familiar with the Bismarck - Her(r)ing.

Sorry, I can't trace my family to Bismarck.  It's just my family traces back to the Prussia; Eastern, Northern Germany; and Western Northern Poland area (on one side).   The what Son-goku5 called a Berliner, my family (and many other German ancestry people in my home town) called a Bismarck.   The other side is also German.  From what is now the Czech Republic (the Sudetenland) , although when they left to come to the US, it was Austria-Hungary.    

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1 hour ago, Tensor said:

Sorry, I can't trace my family to Bismarck.  It's just my family traces back to the Prussia; Eastern, Northern Germany; and Western Northern Poland area (on one side).   The what Son-goku5 called a Berliner, my family (and many other German ancestry people in my home town) called a Bismarck.   The other side is also German.  From what is now the Czech Republic (the Sudetenland) , although when they left to come to the US, it was Austria-Hungary.    

There were many places that "changed hands" a lot these years in these areas. That's why I say my ancestors came from Poland/Russia/Ukraine/Prussia (at least my Sefardi grandma came from a specific contry, these countries did not have so many areas gping back and forth between them).

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So a website made a video about the origins of 'Sufganiot'. My hypothesis was right, the Ashkenazi Jews brought them to Israel. Apparently the origin was south Germany, first there was something similar named Krapfen and then there was the Berliner which is the same. It became THE Hanukkah food, "winning over" foods that Jews from other countries brought, due to the involvement of the biggest workers union (Israel was founded and ruled in its first years by people with a socialistic agenda), they had interest in it because it was harder to make at home than the other foods, so most people would have to buy them.

Edited by bfm

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8 minutes ago, bfm said:

So a website made a video about the origins of 'Sufganiot'. My hypothesis was right, the Ashkenazi Jews brought them to Israel. Apparently the origin was south Germany, first there was something similar named Krapfen and then there was the Berliner which is the same. It became THE Hanukkah food, "winning over" foods that Jews from other countries brought, due to the involvement of the biggest workers union (Israel started as socialism-prone), they had interest in it because it was harder to make at home than the other foods, so most people would have to buy them.

Interesting.  Thanks for sharing!

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you guys remember the chipmunks the cartoon ALVIN! well if you remember it was about the 3 boys then they added the girls

thats almost how i feel about TBBT when they added the 3 girls sure they did it a bit slower but same idea it reminds me of the same thing 

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6 hours ago, MookiStar said:

you guys remember the chipmunks the cartoon ALVIN! well if you remember it was about the 3 boys then they added the girls

thats almost how i feel about TBBT when they added the 3 girls sure they did it a bit slower but same idea it reminds me of the same thing 

Well, it started out 4 dudes and a dudette. They just gradually added more dudettes. :sungum:

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12 hours ago, MookiStar said:

you guys remember the chipmunks the cartoon ALVIN! well if you remember it was about the 3 boys then they added the girls

thats almost how i feel about TBBT when they added the 3 girls sure they did it a bit slower but same idea it reminds me of the same thing 

Interestingly, one of the girls they added to the chipmunks, was played by the original girl on TBBT

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9 hours ago, Tensor said:

Interestingly, one of the girls they added to the chipmunks, was played by the original girl on TBBT

Do you mean the girl in the unaired original pilot? that was really weird to watch i can't imagine if they went ahead with that version of the show Sheldon isn't the sheldon we know 

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4 minutes ago, MookiStar said:

Do you mean the girl in the unaired original pilot? that was really weird to watch i can't imagine if they went ahead with that version of the show Sheldon isn't the sheldon we know 

No, Kaley was the voice of one of the girl chipmunks, in The Road Chip

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2 minutes ago, Tensor said:

No, Kaley is/was the voice of one of the girl chipmunks. 

oh i get what you mean sorry i took original to mean replaced by kaley

 

ah iv watched those movies/shows and never picked up on it will have to watch again now thanks

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Just now, MookiStar said:

oh i get what you mean sorry i took original to mean replaced by kaley

 

ah iv watched those movies/shows and never picked up on it will have to watch again now thanks

Elenaore, in The Road Chip. 

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1 hour ago, joyceraye said:

So the English teacher is working on style - does it include ' where's the missing apostrophe?'?

I'm sure when she had to make the appointment and miss school she just found anything online she could get for us to use as a visual aid. But it IS funny.

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5 hours ago, joyceraye said:

Where it's not only allowed but fashionable and even encouraged, there might be young people mistakenly thinking they are gay when they are really straight. They're the ones I worry about. Someone like Raj who in the 18th century would be known as a dandy or a fop, or a mere rich man who could afford to take care of his skin and hair and who probably dressed in fashionably colourful, flamboyant outfits, could easily in another social circle in this century be persuaded he was gay. Where and when one grows up can make a big difference. 

I don't think it is encouraged in any part of the world. Even in very progressive schools "gay" is sadly still used as a swear word. In many countries gay people can't marry (including my dumb own country where these things are idiotically tied to orthodox institutions) and having children for them is complicated. So I cannot see why people would prefer to live as gay if they're not. There may be some cases here and there but I can't believe they are many. People who think they may be gay but are attracted to the opposite sex may also be bisexual, or mostly straight/gay with some level of attraction to the same/opposite sex (because we force these things into categories, it's more of a continuum). Besides, most people grow up with the assumption they're straight. That means some gay/bisexual people think they're straight at least for some part of their lives. So why is it so bad if a person whose straight thinks they may be gay for some time? There's no blood test that tells us our sexual tendencies so some exploration, in mind and/or in action, is warranted. 

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4 hours ago, bfm said:

I don't think it is encouraged in any part of the world.

Probably not now but it was very common in ancient times...Greece, Rome, and it is certainly in the Bible. When the crowd of men comes to Lot's house and asks him to send out his visitors so they can have sex with them, and he offers his two virgin daughters instead is one of the most messed up parts of the Bible for me.

 

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34 minutes ago, Die Zimtzicke said:

Probably not now but it was very common in ancient times...Greece, Rome, and it is certainly in the Bible. When the crowd of men comes to Lot's house and asks him to send out his visitors so they can have sex with them, and he offers his two virgin daughters instead is one of the most messed up parts of the Bible for me.

 

There are many messed up partsin the Bible >< 

I'm obviously not talking about people who are forced into sexual acts...

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