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Season 12 Chit Chat Thread

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11 hours ago, veejay said:

Making The Big Bang Theory TV Set in Far Cry 5!

Awesome trial for a new adventure game. ūüôā

NICE!

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2 hours ago, Tonstar17 said:

https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-47873592

Well that's neat!

A black hole, which is located in a distant galaxy. The black hole is 500 million trillion km away.
 

Pff, these scientists. We have enough black holes in our galaxy ūüėĄ

But I'd love to go to the center of our galaxy to see the black hole there.

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Pff, these scientists. We have enough black holes in our galaxy
But I'd love to go to the center of our galaxy to see the black hole there.
Too many to count and even outside our local group, beyond the virgo supercluster which contains the Milky Way and a long way to travel. Well to you and me it is, but on the universal scale it's just 0.2% of the distance to the edge of the observable universe.
Even ignoring the expansion of the universe, if you somehow travel the unimaginable distance to this black hole in a single day it'd still take you a year and a half to reach the edge of the universe.





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18 hours ago, Tonstar17 said:

emoji3.png Too many to count and even outside our local group, beyond the virgo supercluster which contains the Milky Way and a long way to travel. Well to you and me it is, but on the universal scale it's just 0.2% of the distance to the edge of the observable universe.
Even ignoring the expansion of the universe, if you somehow travel the unimaginable distance to this black hole in a single day it'd still take you a year and a half to reach the edge of the universe. emoji23.png
 

I'd love to know what would happen if you went past the edge of the universe. Would you even notice? Would it be like a wall or would you suddenly be in nothingness? Or would the area even traversable?

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4 minutes ago, son-goku5 said:

I'd love to know what would happen if you went past the edge of the universe. Would you even notice? Would it be like a wall or would you suddenly be in nothingness? Or would the area even traversable?

It doesn't matter. We know per Douglas Adams there's a good pub there. After one intergalactic gargle blaster nobody wants to go any further.

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Posted (edited)
10 minutes ago, joyceraye said:

It doesn't matter. We know per Douglas Adams there's a good pub there. After one intergalactic gargle blaster nobody wants to go any further.

So true! ūüôā

02.gif.2996cbbab0e0504726c3ba9ac09bd8c9.gif

10.gif.050b3dc6e30838b0728dabdfad0906cb.gif

 

Edited by veejay
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32 minutes ago, son-goku5 said:

I'd love to know what would happen if you went past the edge of the universe. Would you even notice? Would it be like a wall or would you suddenly be in nothingness? Or would the area even traversable?

Deep questions, taking us into the deep!

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Posted (edited)

On a Girl Scout leaders page. (I got an award last Saturday for being one for 30 years.) Too bad they didn't call her Doctor, considering she has a PhD, but the intention was good, I guess.

science.jpg

Edited by Die Zimtzicke
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Posted (edited)

Meanwhile, I'm busy watching Hockey playoffs.  Here's my Hockey Boyfriend...Go Bolts!

giphy.gif

Edited by Carm6773
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I'd love to know what would happen if you went past the edge of the universe. Would you even notice? Would it be like a wall or would you suddenly be in nothingness? Or would the area even traversable?
Deep questions, taking us into the deep!
The question is What is beyond the edge of the known universe?

Space is deep, it is so endless, when you're lost it's so relentless, as Hawkwind once said :-)

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I wonder if the flat earthers think the universe is flat too

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Posted (edited)
7 hours ago, legacy99 said:

I wonder if the flat earthers think the universe is flat too

...and "hot, dark and moist" !? ūüėČ


 
Edited by veejay

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I wonder if the flat earthers think the universe is flat too

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Unfortunately, the biggest thing is what it doesn't tell us. We still don't know if the universe is finite or infinite, let alone flat or slightly curvature.

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On 4/11/2019 at 7:25 AM, son-goku5 said:
On 4/10/2019 at 1:23 PM, Tonstar17 said:

Too many to count and even outside our local group, beyond the virgo supercluster which contains the Milky Way and a long way to travel. Well to you and me it is, but on the universal scale it's just 0.2% of the distance to the edge of the observable universe.
Even ignoring the expansion of the universe, if you somehow travel the unimaginable distance to this black hole in a single day it'd still take you a year and a half to reach the edge of the universe. emoji23.png
 

I'd love to know what would happen if you went past the edge of the universe. Would you even notice? Would it be like a wall or would you suddenly be in nothingness? Or would the area even traversable?

"edge of observable universe" just means theoretically that is as far as can be seen because that is as far as light could travel since the big bang. If you were someplace else the "edge" would also be someplace else (as far as is knowable). It is an theoretical observational edge not an actual edge.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Observable_universe 

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"edge of observable universe" just means theoretically that is as far as can be seen because that is as far as light could travel since the big bang. If you were someplace else the "edge" would also be someplace else (as far as is knowable). It is an theoretical observational edge not an actual edge.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Observable_universe 


Even if its theoretical, is there an edge of the visible universe? how can the universe be expanding if there is no end or edge to it?
The cosmological principle theory, is in part, a consequence of the idea that the laws of physics are the same everywhere.
This implies, there is no edge and no place to go where the universe just ends.

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36 minutes ago, Tonstar17 said:

Even if its theoretical, is there an edge of the visible universe? how can the universe be expanding if there is no end or edge to it?
The cosmological principle theory, is in part, a consequence of the idea that the laws of physics are the same everywhere.
This implies, there is no edge and no place to go where the universe just ends.

My guess is that at some point, all you'd see is blackness because all the matter and energy that was expelled during the Big Bang hasn't reached those areas of space yet. And by empty space I mean truly empty. No space dust, no background radiation etc

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My guess is that at some point, all you'd see is blackness because all the matter and energy that was expelled during the Big Bang hasn't reached those areas of space yet. And by empty space I mean truly empty. No space dust, no background radiation etc

 

Exactly, but the matter and energy must have gone somewhere? All the stars, planets and galaxies that can be seen today make up about 4 percent of the universe. The other 96 percent is made of stuff we can't see, detect or even comprehend. These mysterious substances are called dark energy and dark matter. I guess empty space is where the missing radiation, dark matter and energy are.The region of empty space probably has more energy than everything in the universe, combined.

 

 

 

 

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It's going to depend on the topography of space.  Is it curved or flat.  If curved, does it have positive or negative curvature.   Is it bounded or unbounded? Is it simply connected or is it not?  The math can get  does get frightful.   So simply, if the universe has positive curvature,  it could be unbounded.   Think of sphere or a torus as positive curvature with no bounds (no edge).  If that is the case, there is no edge to the universe.  

The only experimental evidence we have at present, is that, within experimental error, the universe is flat.    As for the rest, we simply don't know.  So we really don't have an  answer to that question, at this time. 

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Tonstar17 said:

Even if its theoretical, is there an edge of the visible universe?ÔĽŅ

An answer would be more philosophy than science.

2 hours ago, Tonstar17 said:

how can the universe be expanding if there is no end or edge to it?

You may not find the answer very satisfying but have a look at https://www.space.com/33005-where-is-the-universes-edge-op-ed.html

Quote

...analogies also carry a fatal flaw. We can all easily imagine an inflating beach ball or a rising loaf of bread, and we immediately think of them as expanding into something: empty air. The beach ball has a skin. The loaf has a delicious, crunchy crust. They have edges, and they're moving into something.

Our minds have played a trick on us, and it's cheating us from being fully awestruck at what's going on.

[snip]

...we can have an expanding universe without needing an edge or a thing for it to expand into. 

I'll admit I have trouble wrapping my head around this concept. But that's the beauty of using mathematics to understand the universe: We can create and manipulate concepts that our brains simply couldn't handle on their own!

 

Edited by djsurrey

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I don't think it matters so long as they're open. By closing time who'd care ?

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It's going to depend on the topography of space.  Is it curved or flat.  If curved, does it have positive or negative curvature.   Is it bounded or unbounded? Is it simply connected or is it not?  The math can get  does get frightful.   So simply, if the universe has positive curvature,  it could be unbounded.   Think of sphere or a torus as positive curvature with no bounds (no edge).  If that is the case, there is no edge to the universe.  
The only experimental evidence we have at present, is that, within experimental error, the universe is flat.    As for the rest, we simply don't know.  So we really don't have an  answer to that question, at this time. 


Yeah, no one answer to these questions, but we cant help speculate.
The left-over radiation from the Big Bang suggest that the universe might be flat? or is there enough matter for the universe to have zero curvature?
The density of matter curves the universe around on itself to form an analogue of a sphere. Is it easily described mathematically. Nope. If the universe is indeed curved, then it is finite, just like the surface of a sphere is. What more, the gravitational pull exerted by all the mass will eventually stop it from expanding and cause it to contract. Eventually it will end in a big crunch.


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Interesting concept. I just can't get my head around the universe expanding but no edge, its like saying, the mysterious substance called dark energy does not exist. It doesn't make sense, but I guess that the mathematics of the concept.


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10 hours ago, Tonstar17 said:

Exactly, but the matter and energy must have gone somewhere? All the stars, planets and galaxies that can be seen today make up about 4 percent of the universe. The other 96 percent is made of stuff we can't see, detect or even comprehend. These mysterious substances are called dark energy and dark matter. I guess empty space is where the missing radiation, dark matter and energy are.The region of empty space probably has more energy than everything in the universe, combined.

That's why they say that empty space isn't truly empty ^^

But I was talking about the space after the space where the energy hasn't reached yet. The universe is still expanding

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15 hours ago, Tonstar17 said:

Interesting concept. I just can't get my head around the universe expanding but no edge, its like saying, the mysterious substance called dark energy does not exist.

Is it? 

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Is it? 
Yep.

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That's why they say that empty space isn't truly empty ^^
But I was talking about the space after the space where the energy hasn't reached yet. The universe is still expanding


That space cannot exist if there are no radiation or energy.

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